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Techie1

Spring Budget: Critics round on Chancellor for not mentioning police funding or pay

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Philip Hammond said he will restore public finances to balance.

budgetspeech.jpg

The Fed, unions and the Mayor of London have criticised the Chancellor for not mentioning public sector pay or police funding in his Spring Budget.

Philip Hammond sang the praises of unexpectedly strong UK growth figures, and introduced policies in health, education and tax today.

He was delivering a statement in which he said his plan is: “To enhance our productivity and protect our living standards, to restore our public finances to balance, and to invest for our future.”

But a lack of mention of police finances drew an instant rebuke from Mayor of London Sadiq Khan.

A statement from his office said: “Sadiq has warned that government’s refusal to fully fund London’s police service is putting the capital’s safety at risk.

“Any further cuts would make it increasingly difficult to maintain the strategic target of 32,000 officers, making it harder to keep Londoners safe from growing security threats.”

The government has insisted it is now protecting police funding, if PCCs increase council tax levels.

Police Federation of England and Wales chairman Steve White said: "With no specific mention of emergency service finances we expect the government to uphold its promise to protect police budgets.

“Leader of the opposition, Jeremy Corbyn, made the point today that the economy is not working for neighbourhoods due to the falling number of police officers.

"Our officers are stretched beyond reasonable capacity, and we will continue to push this fact back to government. In order to protect the public, the police service must have the right investment.”

Elsewhere unions which represent police staff criticised the lack of movement on public sector pay.

Unison general secretary Dave Prentis said: “The pay boost for Westminster politicians should’ve signalled a decent pay rise for the rest of the public sector, especially with inflation almost double the one per cent cap.

“But without a mention from the Chancellor, public service employees will be feeling they’re the forgotten part of the ‘jam’ generation. Most are not managing at all.

“There was nothing today to relieve their ongoing pay pain, and as wages rise elsewhere, public sector workers are being left further and further behind.”

The PCS union, which represents Met Police staff, expressed a similar view.

A statement from the union quoted Theresa May's first speech as Prime Minister in which she said: “If you’re from an ordinary working class family, life is much harder than many people at Westminster realise […]. If you are one of those families, if you are just managing I want to address you directly.”

General secretary Mark Serwotka said public sector employees are “just managing” and pledged to “fight to break the one per cent pay cap”.

Police officer remuneration is now decided by an independent panel, but it takes note of overall public sector pay levels.

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Yeap, a 20yr PC taking home less than £100 a day………………..would a plumber, bricky, plasterer wok for that 24/7 a week?

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Not bad then. Many get a lot less. My daughter who is a nurse would love that amount.

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Yeap, a 20yr PC taking home less than £100 a day………………..would a plumber, bricky, plasterer wok for that 24/7 a week?

Most do. Sure there are the few 'Loadsa Money's picking up more, same as the story a few years ago of constables and Sgts earning upwards of £80k.
My son is a works supervisor for road maintenance firm, directly supervises 22 staff and is responsible for their health and safety. Takes home less than £80 a day, closer to £70.
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Judging by the number of young people applying to join the Police Service it would appear that there are many out there who would willingly work for the current salary and conditions offered to potential police officers and it would also appear many of those currently serving are willing to continue in the Service despite the ravages imposed on police pay, pensions and conditions of service over the past few years, not to speak of the reductions in manpower.

Furthermore, they demonstrate on a daily basis that despite what has been done to them they are still willing to go the extra mile and stick their necks out to make sure the system continues to work and the public receives the best service possible under the circumstances currently prevailing.

Given all the foregoing is it any wonder HMG continues to operate on a `policing on the cheap' basis? After all, we all like a bargain. If the public were in any way interested in the plight of the Police Service and those who work in it they would make an issue of the matter. but they don't because most MOPs seldom think about the police until they find themselves a victim of some crime or misfortune.

 

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I wonder if Steve White noticed that very few departments other than the NHS, education and DFID got mentioned so the police weren't a special case.  If I was him I wouldn't be too worried about this budget but I'd be lobbying the government now to head off the next round of cuts as HMG is talking about 3-6% budget cuts across all departments which presumably will be announced in the Autumn statement.  We got off lightly 1 1/2 years ago due to the Paris attacks but the government has a short memory  and probably thinks that we can sustain more cuts and as we know the largest departments such as health are reasonably well protected from cuts, whereas and despite the governments fine rhetoric, I don't think we are.   

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