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BIkerider

Drug Driving

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From Monday 2nd March the new act comes into force which deals with drugs and driving. Not only the normal intoxication with Class A,  B, or C but also includes prescription drugs which you may have quite lawfully.

 

I believe these mainly cover the opiates and the derivitives, but I understand there is a list of nthese prescription drugs which are not allowed to be in the bloodstream. I cannot recall being told or reading what this list includes, has anyone else any information?

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On the news it said Diazepam and a couple of others which will have a limit on permitted levels in the blood but there's very little info out there. I don't even know who's going to be authorised to perform the tests.

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I honestly hope the roadside machinery to test is there and working properly. I am utterly embarrassed to hear PCs calling up for a working ESD and/or tubes when they have eventually stopped a motorist for a moving traffic offence: to far too many this is apparently not "real" Police work" regardless of what it can lead to; sadly the old school ability to question people has been greatly diminished,if not lost almost completely

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I've read more about this in the media than I have at work.  How do the police expect PCs to enforce this when they don't disseminate the info or testing kit to their own officers?

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I've read more about this in the media than I have at work.  How do the police expect PCs to enforce this when they don't disseminate the info or testing kit to their own officers?

 

 

 

Me too, no info, no training, nothing.

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Wondered why I hadn't heard of this until I realised it was England / Wales, although I'm sure it will come my way sooner or later.   From posts above, it would seem English  Welsh cops don't know about it either, which is frightening really.

 

BBC LINK

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Wondered why I hadn't heard of this until I realised it was England / Wales, although I'm sure it will come my way sooner or later.   From posts above, it would seem English  Welsh cops don't know about it either, which is frightening really.

 

BBC LINK

 

Imagine the scene tonight when I am on nights "Skipper I have arrested this man for failing a roadside drugs test the circumstances are blah, blah, blah, the necessity for arrest is blah,blah,blah"

 

Me "Erm what are you talking about, Never heard of such a thing"

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Bobbies need to be aware that THEY will be subjected to it at work as well. For instance, you are involved in a POLAC. You are tested and they find the presence of a prescribed drug. You will be asked to provide evidence of a prescription. No prescription, you face disciplinary. For instance, you have back pain, and your partner gives you a Tramadol (other painkillers are available)  to ease the pain.  Technically illegal, and could land you in a world of hurt. Sorry about the weak pun....

 

Before you ask, no I have never done it (!), but this scenario was put to me by Occupational Health when I transferred.  They are expecting these sort of issues to arise. 

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It's a bit of a bugger when you have to rely on the media like the Daily Mail to hear about new legislation. Any one heard of any training for this.

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Bobbies need to be aware that THEY will be subjected to it at work as well. For instance, you are involved in a POLAC. You are tested and they find the presence of a prescribed drug. You will be asked to provide evidence of a prescription. No prescription, you face disciplinary. For instance, you have back pain, and your partner gives you a Tramadol (other painkillers are available)  to ease the pain.  Technically illegal, and could land you in a world of hurt. Sorry about the weak pun....

 

Before you ask, no I have never done it (!), but this scenario was put to me by Occupational Health when I transferred.  They are expecting these sort of issues to arise. 

I would guess that there would be officers driving under the influence of worse than prescribed drugs (no I don't know any and have never partaken myself).   If they get found out and dealt with, then that would be a god thing in my book.

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I totally agree with the spirit of this legislation but foresee considerable confusion ahead with regard to its enforcement. I suspect a few lawyers will be rubbing their hands at the prospect of lucrative business arising from the potential legal wrangles which may arise from the complexity of cases which will inevitably come before the courts. 

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