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M&MBM

Females need not stop for unmarked police cars????

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A friend of mine just got this chain email. Sounds like an urban myth to me.

 

A bit of useful advice - verified by the Dorset Police.

The number does work from a mobile.

This actually happened to someone's daughter. Lauren was 19 yrs old and in college.

This story takes place over the Christmas/New Year's holiday break.

It was the Saturday before New Year and it was about 1.00pm in the afternoon, and Lauren was driving to visit a friend, when an UNMARKED police car pulled up behind her and put its lights on. Lauren's parents have 4 children (of various ages) and have always told them never to pull over for an unmarked car on the side of the road, but rather wait until they get to a service station, etc.

So Lauren remembered her parents' advice, and telephoned 112 from her mobile phone.

This connected her to the police dispatcher she told the dispatcher that there was an unmarked car with a flashing blue light behind her and that she would not pull over right away but wait until she was in a service station or busy area.

The dispatcher checked to see if there was a police car where she was and there wasn't and he told her to keep driving, remain calm and that he had back-up already on the way.

Ten minutes later 4 police cars surrounded her and the unmarked car behind her.

One policeman went to her side and the others surrounded the car behind.

They pulled the guy from the car and tackled him to the ground........the man was a convicted rapist and wanted for other crimes.

I never knew that bit of advice, but especially for a woman alone in a car, you do not have to pull over for an UNMARKED car.

Apparently police have to respect your right to keep going to a 'safe' place.

You obviously need to make some signals that you acknowledge them I.e., put on your hazard lights) or call 112 like Lauren did.

Too bad the mobile phone companies don't give you this little bit of wonderful information.

So now it's your turn to let your friends know about 112 (112 is an emergency number on your mobile that takes you straight to the police because 999 does not work if you have no signal).

This is good information that I did not know!



Please pass on to all your friends, especially any females.



As far as I am aware, 112 uses a system called triangulation so they can also pinpoint exactly where you are phoning from.


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999 and 112 both work from phones when you can't get a 'normal' phone signal.

Triangulation of phones can be done - but not quite like has been suggested.

I'm not convinced that anywhere in Section 163 RTA does it state that single females don't need to stop when instructed to do so.  I'm not aware of any case law either.  You stop as soon as it's safe to do so.

Erm.  Yes.

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M I recieved this chain mail a couple of years ago... Funnily enough from some one who is now a Dorset copper.... I made the point that if an unmarked police car is trying to flag you down because they can see fluid pouring from your vehicle what are you going to do, drive on? Service stations in Dorset are few and far between and the majority of traffic police vehicles (as they were) are single crewed..... just to add an ingredient to the mix.....

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I would like to add that if you cannot get a normal signal, no number, including 999 and 112, works. No signal means just that, there is no magic that can suddenly create one. Triangulation is also useless in real time and is not that accurate.

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Erm.  Phone signal Pen...............

Yes, what I should have said is that if you can't get a signal with your provider, but that there is a signal available from another provider, 112 and 999 will still work.

If your phone shows no signal strength, that doesn't necessarily mean that there isn't a signal available.............just that your phone can't find your phone provider's network.

Or something.

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Yes, that is correct, ITYO. Conversely, you may find places where you can see a signal on your phone but it will not connect to any provider. There is a time-out on the signal handshaking and you may be too far from the transmitter.

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How do these people do it then? :-

When I worked in London in the 90's, I often saw armoured cash collection vehicles, usually Group 4 or as it was then, Securicor, with notices on the back stating they would not stop for police, but they would go to the nearest Police Station (Or similar)

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Guest baby elephant
How do these people do it then? :-

When I worked in London in the 90's' date=' I often saw armoured cash collection vehicles, usually Group 4 or as it was then, Securicor, with notices on the back stating they would not stop for police, but they would go to the nearest Police Station (Or similar)
[/quote']

To go to the nearest police station,particularly if you know that its location is close to where you are,is what I have always suggested to anyone,male or female if they have any doubts all.I'm sure that if the ummaked car was ligitimate, the officers would have a sympathetic ear after they had spoken to the driver. Going on from that, I have also suggested to anyone that if they are programming 'home' into their sat-navs, they put in the address of their local police station, that would give a shock to anyone with ill intentions. (If anyone can see a flaw in that I would be grateful to hear it, I could be wrong,it has been known) Wink 

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Load of b****cks.  (did I say that out loud?)

What is? Certainly my statement is fact. It is all linked with how transmitters know which mobiles are in their area so calls can be routed to you. If your mobile takes too long to respond, they assume you have moved to another transmitter's area and cut you off. The actual time of the cut off depends on the size of the cell. There are places in the UK where cells do not overlap and so you get this problem; you can still get a signal from the transmitter but by the time your phone's reply gets back to the transmitter, the transmitter has closed the link.

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How do these people do it then? :-

When I worked in London in the 90's' date=' I often saw armoured cash collection vehicles, usually Group 4 or as it was then, Securicor, with notices on the back stating they would not stop for police, but they would go to the nearest Police Station (Or similar)
[/quote']

Securicor did not use triangulation from mobile phones. They used GPS with additional land based transmitters (expensive) for greater accuracy than could otherwise be achieved at that time. London Transport buses used a similar system. If you looked on the roof above the driver, you would see a small dome which housed the aerial. Shame that nobody told the bomber who sat right under that aerial on the top deck; and blew himself up.Wink

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Load of b****cks.  (did I say that out loud?)


What is? Certainly my statement is fact.


 

Sorry, I meant the original scaremonger story, I got it in an email years ago and it has been doing the rounds ever since.  I, like you Pen, always check these things with Snopes.  I have received several emails of this type, supposedly linked to UK Police Forces, but they are straight lifts from things originating in the US.

 

I don't doubt your knowledge of how phone systems work, particularly since you were involved in the Airwave Project.

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Post Office high-value transit vehicles normally will not stop even for a marked police vehicle. They carry a card which states that the vehicle will proceed to the nearest Police Station where the crew will speak to the police officers.

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[Puts on pedant hatWink]

It was the PSRCP (Public Safety Radio Communications Project). It was not called Airwave until after the system started to go live (and after the project was finished).

[Takes off pedant hat and puts it back in the box for future use]

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