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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/03/17 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    Its a sad indictment of society that NHS staff and paramedics can't be expected to get through their shifts without being assaulted.
  2. 3 points
    Likewise O.C. As far as I am concerned there should be a zero tolerance regarding any form of violence in our hospitals. Like you I visited and encouraged visits by my officers. Nothing like a cuppa and personally knowing the staff.
  3. 3 points
    I always made a point of visiting A&E Departments when on patrol and as a sgt & inspector I frequently instructed my PCs to do likewise. Quite often, if trouble occurred there were already police officers in the A&E Departments already dealing with RTCs, assaults etc. that had occurred outwith the hospital and they would always intervene if necessary to deal with any disturbances occurring within A&E. Eventually, my old force paid officers overtime to police A&E Departments on Friday and Saturday nights but in the present financial situation I understand this no longer happens. I always thought it was a disgrace that people (usually patients) would act in an abusive manner towards medical staff but when alcohol enters the equation (and it usually does on these occasions) then all logical thought evaporates.
  4. 2 points
    Of course, it goes without saying, that my condolences are to the families who lost loved ones in the Manchester Arena attack, RIP all those who lost their lives, and I wish a very speedy recovery to all those injured too. Having said all that, I have just seen Sky news, and it was announced that one of those who was killed was a serving police officer. As a retired police officer now, I would also like to say the same to that officer and their family too. On the report that I saw, it did not say whether it was a male or female officer. It matters not. They were killed carrying out their duty, and whether past or present, it could have been any one of us. As I said, RIP.
  5. 2 points
    You are completely wrong. I am not in the least against those who genuinely suffer from fuel poverty and have difficulty paying heating bills receiving Winter Fuel Allowance. What I do oppose is the payment of this allowance to those perfectly able to pay it without recourse to the benefit system and I would suggest that a significant number of recipients of this allowance are (like me) well able to pay their own way. So the many you refer to who are ``not alright through no fault of their own'' would continue to receive the allowance and the Benefits System would actually be able to pay them an increase in the amount of allowance they receive due to those who do not need it having the allowance withdrawn. What can possibly be wrong with that? Unfortunately, our Benefits System has become a gravy train which a significant number of the population feel it is OK to dip into (if they get the opportunity) even when they have no genuine need of the assistance. It is a `fill your boots' mentality. Politicians of all hues have contributed to this situation by giving bribes to the electorate which are politically difficult to withdraw when they become unsustainable or when it is recognised that they may be inappropriate in certain cases.
  6. 2 points
    These individuals represent everything this country does not need and I do not trust either of them. Quite apart from the economy I remind myself of how they both supported the IRA and continue to refuse to condemn terrorism.
  7. 2 points
    VS and VR, what on earth is happening to the police forces up and down the land. I can understand that those still serving see it as a route to 'kerching' but what ever happened to what I always experienced as a good job/vocation.
  8. 2 points
    Thanx Chief, I did miss the chance of having a good old moan about something, and making some good points too
  9. 2 points
    It must be good news week. This morning I awoke to, the great news that Ian Brady is dead. My father worked on the original enquiries and was amazed at some of the rubbish written about Brady and Hindley. As far as he was concerned they were the most evil people he ever met. Neither showed any remorse for their actions. May they both now rot in Hell.
  10. 2 points
    To a great extent I think you are correct but at the end of the day it has to be said that UKIP has been a success story in that they were at the forefront of propelling the UK towards taking the necessary action leading to us leaving the EU. I voted for UKIP and if the same circumstances prevailed i would do so again. It served its purpose and I am grateful for those who created it and worked for its principal end purpose. I shall not do as I have always done and vote for whichever political party I feel is most likely to be best for the UK and at the moment I have no doubt that party is the Conservative Party. I think UKIP will only reassert itself if the electorate feel HMG is beginning to drag its feet over our exit from the EU but suspect and hope that is unlikely to happen.
  11. 2 points
    I saw the story via Bullshire and UK Cop Humour and saw that every comment on the Sun website was supportive of the police so I think that the intention to write an anti police story has backfired.
  12. 2 points
    "See you tonight Love". "Ok take care" The conversation that every officer has every day on leaving for work, never knowing if he will return. R.I.P. Keith
  13. 2 points
    Things continue to get worse. I don't know whether to laugh or cry when I hear these stories. Still, one of my ancestors told the that my old force used to hire horses from a local undertaker many decades ago when they required a mounted detachment for events but they eventually decided to purchase horses for the mounted branch. Perhaps things will go the full circle and police forces will one day by their own cars.
  14. 2 points
    What a load of rubbish by the DCC, I wish they would start telling the truth….………..'released under investigation” means nothing………they are basically free to commit further crimes. At least bail allowed officers to keep track of suspects after interviewing them. Now, officers will need to get all their evidence together before getting suspects in and once they are in, use the full 24hr clock to finalise the job. This is going to add further pressure on officers to get their work done quicker, resulting in longer delays in getting to active incidents due to lack of resources. More work & pressure for officers in CID & PPU …………………...
  15. 2 points
    I would argue the increase is more in line of folk being more risk averse. With the IPCC forever eager to get involved it's a case of bottom covering.
  16. 2 points
    Indeed, however high the amount goes it will never compensate. But if I were him it would have made me happy to know that my family was going to be able to pay for my funeral and have some financial security for years to come. HMS
  17. 2 points
    Totally agree with regard to references. Few people provide the name of someone as a referee without having first consulted them and ascertained that they will provide comments of a favourable nature. I have only heard of one instance of a referee failing to support the candidate. In my old force we always did unannounced home visits on candidates but I am informed this is no longer the case. There is little doubt in my mind that this aspect of enquiring into the background of candidates had deteriorated.
  18. 2 points
  19. 2 points
    Zulu' To be frank, I think references are worthless unless they are properly examined - in the case of candidates for entry to any Police position (warranted or not), all referees should be visited and examined on their assessment of the individual (I wouldn't do this until the final stage when someone is seriously being considered for appointment). This used to happen - I know for certain that when I joined the Met Specials my three referees were personally interviewed by the then Manchester City Police. One was my former school headmaster who said I was unlikely to stick at it as my attention was quickly diverted - I saw this and the other referees' comments just after I received the first bar to my LS&GC medal (our Regular Liaison Inspector had a sense of the ironic in showing me the headmaster's comments). To get back to the references issue - no-one gives a person as a referee unless they think they will give a good reference. I have done maybe 20+ referee visits and only once did someone suggest that the subject individual might be unsuitable. A lot of background checking these days is done on-line - social-media is a potential mine of information about attitudes, opinions, acquaintances etc but you cannot beat a face-to-face interview with someone who knows the candidate! One way or another, these individuals were either very lucky or "love" made them irrational .............. I'm a cynic - so I think the seeds of dishonesty and poor character were there all the time - they just weren't identified for whatever reason!
  20. 2 points
    We all know how they got through the selection process. Maturity, capability and a track record of ethical behaviour are no longer requirements. I don't say this with any cynicism- these qualities have been deprioritised. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  21. 2 points
    From the information that is now coming to light - no assessment made of his mental health, suppressed evidence of the environment and the situation in his particular duty location, barring a senior RM officer who was critical of the local command and supervision, and a trial by his "peers" who were not actually anything like his peers - three of the panel being HQ RN officers not operational RM officers - suggests to me that justice could not have been at the forefront of the mind of the Military Prosecuting Authority. Perhaps they do training attachments with the CPS. It is difficult to defend someone who is intent on murder but all the circumstances suggest that any other service person might have done the same in those circumstances when they were under extreme pressure and had been badly let-down by their superiors - having seen pictures of the checkpoint that C/Sgt Blackman commanded, it was almost undefendable - low walls, no cover except sweltering hot metal containers, no toilet facilities and no defences again mortars, RPGs, not grenades / IEDs. I am with Frederick Forsyth when he suggests that someone needs to investigate not just the court process but also the chain-of-command. I was amused to see the PM say that the MoD have been supporting the Blackmans throughout the trial and appeal - what an absolute load of b#ll#cks. I rarely use this sort of profanity but this case is definitely an exception where only such a word can describe what was said! :-(
  22. 2 points
    Is it something you should deal with, is it something you could deal with? Personally if someone offered me drugs but I didn't see them I would submit Intel when next on duty. If someone showed me a load of drugs the I would phone it in and try to get on duty officers there to deal (no pun intended). Step in and try to capture dealer may result in a couple of his minders bundling you into the toilet as he makes his escape and you are left feeling silly and bruised. My intervention while off duty went back to line one of the responsibilities - the protection of life and (sometimes) property. Sent from me using Witchcraft
  23. 2 points
    Based on the Information she had at the time - bearing mind she had only taken over the reigns 20 mins before - her decision making was found to be faultless. The result was bad but that's another matter. We often hear, and read on here, about junior officers who make decisions and then are castigated by the 'nine o'clock jury' who have the luxury of time and hindsight to find fault. Ms Dick was subjected to the greatest possible scrutiny and found to be blameless for her decision making. Quite rightly her career has not been halted by the end result of that decision being unfortunate. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  24. 1 point
    Payments of this nature have been made for many years and if Police Scotland are now reneging on making them it would appear that they have been paying out erroneously for some time. This is yet another example of the powers that be trying to save money by disregarding the relevant Regulations. If they no longer wish to follow the Regulations concerned they should take the necessary steps to have them altered but they know that the forearms officers concerned will continue to put themselves forward for this type of duty even if they lose the court action described as giving up the coveted firearms ticket will not be considered an option by those who hold one. A return to ordinary duties would be anathema for most of them.
  25. 1 point
    The decision would have been a good one if the information that she had been provided was true. She did not have command during that part of the surveillance phase and did what she had to do to protect the wider public. Yes it was terrible DeMenezes died, but when you pull that whole thing apart Cressida Dick was not to blame. She had the gumption to make a tough call and telling them to stop the target by any means necessary was what needed to be done in light of what they thought was unfolding. It was a horrific mistake but the mistake made was not hers.