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Showing content with the highest reputation since 09/02/17 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    Its a sad indictment of society that NHS staff and paramedics can't be expected to get through their shifts without being assaulted.
  2. 3 points
    Likewise O.C. As far as I am concerned there should be a zero tolerance regarding any form of violence in our hospitals. Like you I visited and encouraged visits by my officers. Nothing like a cuppa and personally knowing the staff.
  3. 3 points
    I always made a point of visiting A&E Departments when on patrol and as a sgt & inspector I frequently instructed my PCs to do likewise. Quite often, if trouble occurred there were already police officers in the A&E Departments already dealing with RTCs, assaults etc. that had occurred outwith the hospital and they would always intervene if necessary to deal with any disturbances occurring within A&E. Eventually, my old force paid officers overtime to police A&E Departments on Friday and Saturday nights but in the present financial situation I understand this no longer happens. I always thought it was a disgrace that people (usually patients) would act in an abusive manner towards medical staff but when alcohol enters the equation (and it usually does on these occasions) then all logical thought evaporates.
  4. 2 points
    It must be good news week. This morning I awoke to, the great news that Ian Brady is dead. My father worked on the original enquiries and was amazed at some of the rubbish written about Brady and Hindley. As far as he was concerned they were the most evil people he ever met. Neither showed any remorse for their actions. May they both now rot in Hell.
  5. 2 points
    To a great extent I think you are correct but at the end of the day it has to be said that UKIP has been a success story in that they were at the forefront of propelling the UK towards taking the necessary action leading to us leaving the EU. I voted for UKIP and if the same circumstances prevailed i would do so again. It served its purpose and I am grateful for those who created it and worked for its principal end purpose. I shall not do as I have always done and vote for whichever political party I feel is most likely to be best for the UK and at the moment I have no doubt that party is the Conservative Party. I think UKIP will only reassert itself if the electorate feel HMG is beginning to drag its feet over our exit from the EU but suspect and hope that is unlikely to happen.
  6. 2 points
    I saw the story via Bullshire and UK Cop Humour and saw that every comment on the Sun website was supportive of the police so I think that the intention to write an anti police story has backfired.
  7. 2 points
    "See you tonight Love". "Ok take care" The conversation that every officer has every day on leaving for work, never knowing if he will return. R.I.P. Keith
  8. 2 points
    Things continue to get worse. I don't know whether to laugh or cry when I hear these stories. Still, one of my ancestors told the that my old force used to hire horses from a local undertaker many decades ago when they required a mounted detachment for events but they eventually decided to purchase horses for the mounted branch. Perhaps things will go the full circle and police forces will one day by their own cars.
  9. 2 points
    What a load of rubbish by the DCC, I wish they would start telling the truth….………..'released under investigation” means nothing………they are basically free to commit further crimes. At least bail allowed officers to keep track of suspects after interviewing them. Now, officers will need to get all their evidence together before getting suspects in and once they are in, use the full 24hr clock to finalise the job. This is going to add further pressure on officers to get their work done quicker, resulting in longer delays in getting to active incidents due to lack of resources. More work & pressure for officers in CID & PPU …………………...
  10. 2 points
    I would argue the increase is more in line of folk being more risk averse. With the IPCC forever eager to get involved it's a case of bottom covering.
  11. 2 points
    Indeed, however high the amount goes it will never compensate. But if I were him it would have made me happy to know that my family was going to be able to pay for my funeral and have some financial security for years to come. HMS
  12. 2 points
    Totally agree with regard to references. Few people provide the name of someone as a referee without having first consulted them and ascertained that they will provide comments of a favourable nature. I have only heard of one instance of a referee failing to support the candidate. In my old force we always did unannounced home visits on candidates but I am informed this is no longer the case. There is little doubt in my mind that this aspect of enquiring into the background of candidates had deteriorated.
  13. 2 points
    Zulu' To be frank, I think references are worthless unless they are properly examined - in the case of candidates for entry to any Police position (warranted or not), all referees should be visited and examined on their assessment of the individual (I wouldn't do this until the final stage when someone is seriously being considered for appointment). This used to happen - I know for certain that when I joined the Met Specials my three referees were personally interviewed by the then Manchester City Police. One was my former school headmaster who said I was unlikely to stick at it as my attention was quickly diverted - I saw this and the other referees' comments just after I received the first bar to my LS&GC medal (our Regular Liaison Inspector had a sense of the ironic in showing me the headmaster's comments). To get back to the references issue - no-one gives a person as a referee unless they think they will give a good reference. I have done maybe 20+ referee visits and only once did someone suggest that the subject individual might be unsuitable. A lot of background checking these days is done on-line - social-media is a potential mine of information about attitudes, opinions, acquaintances etc but you cannot beat a face-to-face interview with someone who knows the candidate! One way or another, these individuals were either very lucky or "love" made them irrational .............. I'm a cynic - so I think the seeds of dishonesty and poor character were there all the time - they just weren't identified for whatever reason!
  14. 2 points
    We all know how they got through the selection process. Maturity, capability and a track record of ethical behaviour are no longer requirements. I don't say this with any cynicism- these qualities have been deprioritised. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  15. 2 points
    From the information that is now coming to light - no assessment made of his mental health, suppressed evidence of the environment and the situation in his particular duty location, barring a senior RM officer who was critical of the local command and supervision, and a trial by his "peers" who were not actually anything like his peers - three of the panel being HQ RN officers not operational RM officers - suggests to me that justice could not have been at the forefront of the mind of the Military Prosecuting Authority. Perhaps they do training attachments with the CPS. It is difficult to defend someone who is intent on murder but all the circumstances suggest that any other service person might have done the same in those circumstances when they were under extreme pressure and had been badly let-down by their superiors - having seen pictures of the checkpoint that C/Sgt Blackman commanded, it was almost undefendable - low walls, no cover except sweltering hot metal containers, no toilet facilities and no defences again mortars, RPGs, not grenades / IEDs. I am with Frederick Forsyth when he suggests that someone needs to investigate not just the court process but also the chain-of-command. I was amused to see the PM say that the MoD have been supporting the Blackmans throughout the trial and appeal - what an absolute load of b#ll#cks. I rarely use this sort of profanity but this case is definitely an exception where only such a word can describe what was said! :-(
  16. 2 points
    It is nothing less than a huge farce and what does it say about the hierarchy of the GMP. They look after their own why they will happily crucify junior officers for, compared to ACC Sutcliffe's offence, are minor issues.
  17. 2 points
    The truth of the matter is that Policescotland is totally and utterly broke. Since its creation various methods have been used in an attempt to make economies, including the controversial reduction of police support staff which means that many officers who should be on operational duties now have to undertake those functions latterly perfromed by the support staff who are no longer there. It has been obvious for some time that the only way to successfully achieve the cash savings required is to reduce the numbers of sworn officers abd that it what is being done. I know of nobody who truly believes anything other than that. The statements issuing from the current Chief Constable and others in authority concerned with Police Scotland amount to nothing more than smoke and mirrors in attempt to placate the public. Why can't they just say `Look, we are broke. We will have to reduce the saize of our establishment if we are to get anywhere near the savings necessary and the public weill just have to accept the reduced service they will receive.''
  18. 2 points
    Is it something you should deal with, is it something you could deal with? Personally if someone offered me drugs but I didn't see them I would submit Intel when next on duty. If someone showed me a load of drugs the I would phone it in and try to get on duty officers there to deal (no pun intended). Step in and try to capture dealer may result in a couple of his minders bundling you into the toilet as he makes his escape and you are left feeling silly and bruised. My intervention while off duty went back to line one of the responsibilities - the protection of life and (sometimes) property. Sent from me using Witchcraft
  19. 2 points
    Based on the Information she had at the time - bearing mind she had only taken over the reigns 20 mins before - her decision making was found to be faultless. The result was bad but that's another matter. We often hear, and read on here, about junior officers who make decisions and then are castigated by the 'nine o'clock jury' who have the luxury of time and hindsight to find fault. Ms Dick was subjected to the greatest possible scrutiny and found to be blameless for her decision making. Quite rightly her career has not been halted by the end result of that decision being unfortunate. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  20. 2 points
    I am an MOP with a bit of (now rapidly ageing) Police perspective. So, here's my view: A warranted officer is a warranted officer - all the same, irrespective of rank, when the sh#t hits the fan, I expect them all to do the same thing - take action! I once patrolled with the then Chief Superintendent George Rushbrook, on a Sunday morning along the Bayswater Road. George Rushbrook retired as a Commander and was rated in a book, "The Signs of Crime", as one of the most practical detectives in the Met. He was also a really nice bloke. During that Sunday patrol, one of the many things he said was " it doesn't matter who you are in The Job, what matters is what you do". I think that about sums up how I see policing - rank really isn't the issue but what an individual actually achieves is what is important. So Response / CID / Specialist Squads are not so important (particularly to the end-user - Joe & Josephine Public); they would like to see more blue suits with shiny buttons and pointed hats on the streets (with body armour but probably without lime-green or similar hued jackets etc). That's really what policing is about - and has been since 1829 when "the first objective to be obtained is the prevention of crime"! For what it's worth, this is just a view from a man who once rode on The Clapham Omnibus
  21. 2 points
    Absolutely the same where I am. Response officers taking no ownership of incidents, standard of evidential packages regularly poor as a result, and CID constantly trying to pick up the pieces. Whilst response may occasionally work overtime on scene preservation, bed watches and the like, CID officers rarely get off on time, regularly working extended hours. Double shifts and beyond are not unusual. Crime queues running into the 20's and 30's are common, with DS's having to manage teams which, between them, can be carrying 160 crimes plus. A nightmare for the officers, a waking nightmare for DS's who I know are having sleepless nights, and no sort of service for victims. The wheel has well and truly come off down our way.
  22. 2 points
    If you look at it from a military angle, who runs the Regiment the C.O. or the RSM. The ones who come through University usually does 6 months at Sandhurst and come out as a rather incompetent Rupert, whereas the one without that educational background does 2 years and comes out, mainly as a competent junior officer. Education is not everything, knowledge does not necessarily bring experience.
  23. 2 points
    I do travel a bit. It's an interesting question as to how well travelled - I counted up and it's over 30 different countries as well, whether that counts as well travelled I have no idea. Probably not. However I have experienced other police forces which range from the truly awful to superb. The point I was making was less about the institution of policing but more about the effectiveness of them, hence the crime rates aspect. I realise that police are not solely responsible for that - there are many other factors, but it's an indication. I was also comparing with similarly Western developed countries - European ones in the main. The main thrust was to counter the argument that we are not the best by any means. Incidentally where we do fall down is in smartness. We must be getting on for one of the scruffiest police organisations in the world! Dont misunderstand me, I'm not denigrating the Police in any way, it's a fantastic job. However having done a few years I do recognise its faults and that it's not perfect. We have been trading on the legacy of tradition and reputation 'the good old British bobby' for far too long and it's not helping us any more. Someone described the police about 10 years ago as 'slowly coming to terms with the twentieth century' which I thought was quite apt. We need to adapt to modern times and with 19th century thinking that's never going to happen. The evidence is clearly there to suggest that things are not perfect so changes need to be made. Yes Direct Entry might not work. But conversely it might and until we try it, how will we know?
  24. 2 points
    I would suggest the need for change in a functioning system is the thing that needs to be evidenced, not the need not to. Evolution has a lot of dead ends and extinctions and I would rather we didn't utilise trial and error when lives are at stake. So I disagree- where is the evidence? I am not the one saying things are so bad we must transplant a major organ in the Policing physiology....
  25. 2 points
    Let us hope that the officer is alright. The report does not make any comment of his injuries or condition. Every time we go out on to the street we never know if we will come back. Hope the officer has a full and speedy recovery.