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Showing content with the highest reputation since 03/01/17 in all areas

  1. 4 points
    I am not a Police officer but have enough experience of policing and as a junior, middle & senior manager in a number of structured organisations, to know that Direct entry to Police above the level of Constable would be very dangerous. There are very few non-Police managers who will have the breadth of experience that will enable them to take both a strategic and tactical view of policing situations and, at the same time, have the tacit knowledge gained from personal experience, that is essential when making decisions within split-seconds and under pressure. I have a pretty open mind (RM please note ) when it comes to developing people and moving them up in organisations depending on their skills and capabilities. However, a Policing environment is different - the "stakeholders" (sorry about that word) in a policing situation are not just Police Officers but the vast array of the public as individuals or organisations with varying levels of interest. To be able to deal with such interests, a Police Supervisor needs experience in dealing with people often in traumatic / pressured situations. That doesn't often happen in office environments nor even in the retail trade. What might be appropriate is for some senior level Police jobs that do not require warranted powers to be done by non-Police officers but the essence of the British Police Officer on-the-streets is that he/she is experienced, can exercise split-second judgement, can be compassionate and well-versed in the rights and wrongs of the Law and what actions they must take or can exercise with discretion. There might be small numbers of former Armed Forces SNCOs and officers who might be able to bring the necessary tactical / strategic skills & experience but run-of-the-mill civilian managers - sorry, not on!
  2. 4 points
    Mark, I'm sure things vary from force to force but personally I am knackered. Every shift I am playing catch up. Last set of lates I had to stay on until 5am on one of them and 3 on the others just to catch up with my admin(and I don't get overtime). Every current missing person is supposed to be reviewed and taskings added. I am usually covering absences so have a responsibility covering a square mileage you wouldn't believe and I daren't write because the public will read it. Every new missing person has to be risk assessed and if it's high I co-ordinate as SIO. On nights I cover PACE as well, I do all the authorisations for vehicle seizures, over time and SIG markers. I am providing advice to often upward of 6 sergeants. Anything that requires safeguarding I review and ratify in writing what we have and haven't done and in between I deal with my complaints workload. I also have assessments for temporary Sergeants under my supervision to do for their promotion diplomas. While juggling all that I attend anything that sounds griefy, violent, complicated or messy. I review the deaths and decide if it's sus or not and carry the can for anything that goes wrong. I make sure I am seen about in all the nicks so people can doorstep me and am constantly putting out "fires". I am just touching on the tip of the iceberg of what I do and what my responsibilities are. -Every shift I am in 30 minutes to an hour early and off frequently long after all the PC's and my sergeants have gone home. On RD's I am checking emails appealing annual leave refusals and negotiating attachments for courses- If I didn't my inbox would fill up too fast I also stand in the CI/Supts office and pin my ears back and take the heat when a PC or skipper makes a mistake-Where I can I absorb that heat and if they don't need to know my teams don't hear about it. One of the new Inspectors on my rotation regularly went to the gents to throw up because his anxiety levels got so high with the responsibility he was carrying.... When I was a PC I had no idea what the Inspector did and very cushy it looked too. Don't get me wrong I enjoy my role but I/we work hard too. If my team spoke about me the way you've talked about your Insp I would be mortified.... HMS
  3. 3 points
    Where have all the old contributors gone to. When the site changed in January I found great difficulty in accessing the forum. I had registered originally with an email address I no longer used because it had been hacked. I could not change my password or anything. It was fortunate that I was able to contact the administrator and Moderators and they managed to sort out my new (Well old secure) email address and for me to set a new password. But where on earth are Quokka, Westie, Itoldyouonce, Cheese, Reasonable Man, GManc,Spider, etc,etc. I have joined one of the sister sites but it appears to be mainly Specials and PCSO's who know everything about everything, whilst, at the same time, knowing nothing. Experience is scorned as a dirty word. There do have to be different opinions, otherwise you would have a sterile environment with every poster saying "Yes I agree" agree, agree. I do hope that the old posters on here have not disappeared for good. Come back we need you. This edit was made after someone clicked "Like" The sister also seems to be very much Met orientated and they seem to work off different rules and even laws than the rest not us Plebs. And before someone replies, I am not anti Met, but there is life north of Watford Gap.
  4. 3 points
    I am not biased against direct entry because I have no right to be. However, as a fairly experienced senior manager across a number of public service-type organisations and 27 years as a Special, I have a view that the complexities and challenges of Policing are such that it would be dangerous to put relatively inexperienced individuals into command positions in potentially difficult situations. I know I need not tell you that the consequences of mistakes in such situations are significant - not just for the individual making the mistake but also others involved in the situation. I do not think that the marginal benefit that some might see from direct entry is worth the trauma and cost that would ensue from an inexperienced direct-entry Inspector making a cock-up simply because they did not have the depth of experience they would have gained if they had joined as a PC and progressed to Inspector through time as a PS.
  5. 2 points
    I saw the story via Bullshire and UK Cop Humour and saw that every comment on the Sun website was supportive of the police so I think that the intention to write an anti police story has backfired.
  6. 2 points
    Things continue to get worse. I don't know whether to laugh or cry when I hear these stories. Still, one of my ancestors told the that my old force used to hire horses from a local undertaker many decades ago when they required a mounted detachment for events but they eventually decided to purchase horses for the mounted branch. Perhaps things will go the full circle and police forces will one day by their own cars.
  7. 2 points
    What a load of rubbish by the DCC, I wish they would start telling the truth….………..'released under investigation” means nothing………they are basically free to commit further crimes. At least bail allowed officers to keep track of suspects after interviewing them. Now, officers will need to get all their evidence together before getting suspects in and once they are in, use the full 24hr clock to finalise the job. This is going to add further pressure on officers to get their work done quicker, resulting in longer delays in getting to active incidents due to lack of resources. More work & pressure for officers in CID & PPU …………………...
  8. 2 points
    I would argue the increase is more in line of folk being more risk averse. With the IPCC forever eager to get involved it's a case of bottom covering.
  9. 2 points
    Totally agree with regard to references. Few people provide the name of someone as a referee without having first consulted them and ascertained that they will provide comments of a favourable nature. I have only heard of one instance of a referee failing to support the candidate. In my old force we always did unannounced home visits on candidates but I am informed this is no longer the case. There is little doubt in my mind that this aspect of enquiring into the background of candidates had deteriorated.
  10. 2 points
    Zulu' To be frank, I think references are worthless unless they are properly examined - in the case of candidates for entry to any Police position (warranted or not), all referees should be visited and examined on their assessment of the individual (I wouldn't do this until the final stage when someone is seriously being considered for appointment). This used to happen - I know for certain that when I joined the Met Specials my three referees were personally interviewed by the then Manchester City Police. One was my former school headmaster who said I was unlikely to stick at it as my attention was quickly diverted - I saw this and the other referees' comments just after I received the first bar to my LS&GC medal (our Regular Liaison Inspector had a sense of the ironic in showing me the headmaster's comments). To get back to the references issue - no-one gives a person as a referee unless they think they will give a good reference. I have done maybe 20+ referee visits and only once did someone suggest that the subject individual might be unsuitable. A lot of background checking these days is done on-line - social-media is a potential mine of information about attitudes, opinions, acquaintances etc but you cannot beat a face-to-face interview with someone who knows the candidate! One way or another, these individuals were either very lucky or "love" made them irrational .............. I'm a cynic - so I think the seeds of dishonesty and poor character were there all the time - they just weren't identified for whatever reason!
  11. 2 points
    We all know how they got through the selection process. Maturity, capability and a track record of ethical behaviour are no longer requirements. I don't say this with any cynicism- these qualities have been deprioritised. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  12. 2 points
    It is nothing less than a huge farce and what does it say about the hierarchy of the GMP. They look after their own why they will happily crucify junior officers for, compared to ACC Sutcliffe's offence, are minor issues.
  13. 2 points
    Is it something you should deal with, is it something you could deal with? Personally if someone offered me drugs but I didn't see them I would submit Intel when next on duty. If someone showed me a load of drugs the I would phone it in and try to get on duty officers there to deal (no pun intended). Step in and try to capture dealer may result in a couple of his minders bundling you into the toilet as he makes his escape and you are left feeling silly and bruised. My intervention while off duty went back to line one of the responsibilities - the protection of life and (sometimes) property. Sent from me using Witchcraft
  14. 2 points
    Absolutely the same where I am. Response officers taking no ownership of incidents, standard of evidential packages regularly poor as a result, and CID constantly trying to pick up the pieces. Whilst response may occasionally work overtime on scene preservation, bed watches and the like, CID officers rarely get off on time, regularly working extended hours. Double shifts and beyond are not unusual. Crime queues running into the 20's and 30's are common, with DS's having to manage teams which, between them, can be carrying 160 crimes plus. A nightmare for the officers, a waking nightmare for DS's who I know are having sleepless nights, and no sort of service for victims. The wheel has well and truly come off down our way.
  15. 2 points
    If you look at it from a military angle, who runs the Regiment the C.O. or the RSM. The ones who come through University usually does 6 months at Sandhurst and come out as a rather incompetent Rupert, whereas the one without that educational background does 2 years and comes out, mainly as a competent junior officer. Education is not everything, knowledge does not necessarily bring experience.
  16. 2 points
    I don't think that anyone can answer that. I am thankful that the many harrowing things I experienced have had no great effect on me - or rather I don't believe they had. I don't know why that is though. You I had colleagues not so fortunate who went wibble sometimes many years later. Not trying to worry you, just saying some are fortunate while others are not. You should have some sort of assistance through your occupational health department and if you are thinking about this in a day or two I strongly recommend making contact with them. The worst thing you can do is take the macho 'I'm a cop, it's what I'm paid to deal with.' attitude. A former colleague of mine, ex Royal Marine, loud, brash, dealt with anything and laughed it off type went missing about six months after he retired. Turned out he wasn't as capable of dealing with all that stuff as everyone thought. Happy ending but he came back to some psychological treatment to see him through that maybe he should have had years before. Good luck.
  17. 2 points
    I do travel a bit. It's an interesting question as to how well travelled - I counted up and it's over 30 different countries as well, whether that counts as well travelled I have no idea. Probably not. However I have experienced other police forces which range from the truly awful to superb. The point I was making was less about the institution of policing but more about the effectiveness of them, hence the crime rates aspect. I realise that police are not solely responsible for that - there are many other factors, but it's an indication. I was also comparing with similarly Western developed countries - European ones in the main. The main thrust was to counter the argument that we are not the best by any means. Incidentally where we do fall down is in smartness. We must be getting on for one of the scruffiest police organisations in the world! Dont misunderstand me, I'm not denigrating the Police in any way, it's a fantastic job. However having done a few years I do recognise its faults and that it's not perfect. We have been trading on the legacy of tradition and reputation 'the good old British bobby' for far too long and it's not helping us any more. Someone described the police about 10 years ago as 'slowly coming to terms with the twentieth century' which I thought was quite apt. We need to adapt to modern times and with 19th century thinking that's never going to happen. The evidence is clearly there to suggest that things are not perfect so changes need to be made. Yes Direct Entry might not work. But conversely it might and until we try it, how will we know?
  18. 2 points
    Let us hope that the officer is alright. The report does not make any comment of his injuries or condition. Every time we go out on to the street we never know if we will come back. Hope the officer has a full and speedy recovery.
  19. 2 points
    Your opinions and you are welcome to them. I must say though the polcomforum is not just for PCSO's or Specials, regular officers who have got ALOT of experience are some of our most regular contributors,just because they don't agree with you does not mean they "know nothing" As for this forum, yes it is quiet, it has been very quiet for a number of years now, however hopefully in due course it will pick up. What might be more constructive than insulting members from a different forum is to give your ideas on how this forum could be improved?
  20. 2 points
    You are there to make the decisions and you live or die by them. Many times the troops do not know the flack that are shielding them from. Strange that my children now thank me for the guidance through those tender years, up to about 30.
  21. 2 points
    Amy, I did your survey however I would like you and you supervisor to have the following feedback. Your questions are loaded. For example there is an entire section where you force the subject to give evidence of racial bias both positive and negative. There is no option to express that you find it inappropriate to utilise racial stereotypes only to say what they are. Many of your questions are largely binary in nature but the topics you approach much more complex. Like do you believe all rapists should receive punishments beyond imprisonment like "being whipped in the streets". If you are going to ask questions like that you need to give an option for each case being treated on it's own merits. Much of the survey appears aimed at people who are still in full time education rather than Police Officers. Whoever wrote that has a simplistic view of the world and apparently a neo liberal political view with a dislike of Police Officers. In essence Martin Luther King or the Archangel Gabriel(If he exists) could complete your survey and it would make them appear racist. Can I ask you some questions:- Your survey is it intended to a) Denigrate Police Officers b ) Insult Police Officers c) Get rid of Police Officers or d) Embarrass Police Officers. Do you think Police Officers are :- Somewhat racist b ) Very racist c) Extremely racist d) Unicorns Sorry they are the only answers you get and you have to choose one....... This is poor biased work.
  22. 2 points
    Our job is largely based around managing conflict. We mediate, we enforce, we suppress the likelihood of harm. Now within the job there are many officers of both sexes who know how to do that. Truthfully though the vast majority of that percentage are men. Men and women are different. Both the men and women that get promoted into leadership positions who cannot perform those core functions generally do not have my respect. Because they didn't have it when they were front line and I helped carry them. Those individuals if they are honest with themselves realise they aren't suited to Policing. If they aren't honest with themselves they say that it is everyone else who isn't suited to Policing. These are the officers who never get to the big fight but take the view that those that did used excessive force or were unprofessional. When they get promoted(often quickly to escape what they can't deal with) they retain this view and become the ivory tower seat polishers and the callers for the acclaimed BEST police force in the world to be reformed. Direct entry is just another way to get more of these cowards into positions of power without getting found out for what they are on the sharp end. Those misogynists of old you refer to RM.... They had a point and what they said was true and was absolutely in the spirit of equality. Men and women - earn your respect and your gender becomes largely irrelevant. Respect does not just get handed to you however. You can be "a woman" or you can have as much scrambled egg on your cap as you like. Man or woman I'll respect you as a Police officer when you've earned it.
  23. 2 points
    I do not like Richard Littlejohn but on this topic he is spot on. Why should anyone weep for a known drug dealer, who has with him an automatic hand gun. He was the author of his own misfortune. My sympathy goes to the firearms officer who people will try to hang out to dry. It would be an excellent use of Federation Funds to fund any defence of the officer I would also hope that the Chief Officer will have the balls to stand up and be counted in supporting his officers.
  24. 2 points
    Faceache is a leaky sieve when it comes to security. I am a member because I need the networking and it's been a good way to keep up with my family. But nothing is safe there. That said, nothing is safe here either. Nothing. Faceache has privacy settings so only friends can see most of my posts, However, those friends could lift stuff off my page, they could also put stuff on my page, though I have set that such that it's visible to "only me". That doesn't stop the owners of Faceache looking at it if they so desired, though. Neither does it stop certain agencies from snooping. The FB adverts I see are dictated by my tastes and my recent amazon browsing history. There ain't no such thing as a free lunch. If I join a "public" FB group, my posts are visible to whomever chooses to look at the group and to all my friends, who get the posts on their feeds ad nauseaum. So, basically, you may think the settings are private, that you're posting something only the chosen few will see, but it all depends on how much you trust that chosen few. Basically don't post anything you wouldn't mind being pasted to the No 21a bus.
  25. 2 points
    In my old force ,if you passed everything you could be independent at 7 months service.A scary thought ! Be prepared to be endlessly messed about having shifts changed at short notice.The first two years I would agrue you should put your career first, knock your nuts off and get a good reputation. Enjoy the first 6 months but learn as much law as you can ( I wish I had). Good luck.I echo the above post re PSD the only department which has grown year on year.