Copperballs

Survival rates beyond retirement????

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I am 37 years old and have comleted 12 years service (all on front line policing). However, someone recently told me that when Officers retire, the survival rates beyond 7 years in retirement are rare!

Anyone know how we can check up on what the average age of death is for retired police officers? I'm leaving this job soon.......

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Copperballs

 

According to some occupational health expert who gave a talk on my re-Retirement Course, the 7-year life expectancy of retired police officers related back to just before the First World War when a working class British male could expect to live into his late fifties.  So it's a bit out of date! LOL

 

The commutation formula was devised many years ago, and then it was calculated upon an expected pension payment to both officer and partner of 22-years, after which the scheme was in credit.  So back then, they expected you to keep going for at least that long on average.

 

I don't think it is meaningful to look at life expectancy after police service, but rather compare life expectancy as a whole as we are nowadays little different to the rest of the population.  That means that, if you (a) keep yourself fit and healthy, (B) you join the job in your early twenties at the latest, and © you are lucky, you should be able to claim pension for at least as long as you have been paying into the scheme.

 

Brutus 

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I have always understood it was about 10 yrs or so, on that standard I have 3 to go.

However in the newsletter I recieve every so often there are reports of people surviving well into their 80's and 90's before turning their toes up.

I don't think there is anything one can do to avoid meeting the Grim Reaper once your name has been called. Live life every day as if it is your last!

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On our Routine Orders we regularly get notifications of deaths of retired officers, some of whom have died well into their 80's or 90s. 

 

I always drink a toast to anybody who has spent longer drawing their pension than they did earning it!!!!Wink

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Retire and then work for your local trading standards. You will be so busy, counting your money you won't have time to worry about dying!  Shootist may confirm this! Big%20smileBig%20smileBig%20smile

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Shifts have alot to do with the figures also. Stats show that working nights, quick turnovers etc into your 40's can reduce your life span significantly. So don't feel guilty about applying for a nice day job around that point!

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I did and I have!

 

Would I go back to wearing uniform, dealing with fights and domestics and working 24 hour shifts?

 

You could not pay me enough.Wink

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Because the Mounties have regimental numbers and a news  Magazine, ( called the Quarterly),  that is posted to every subscribing member, retired or not, it is easy to note who has died at an earlier age than the general population.

 

I have noted that if a retired member survives past five years after retirement, then he or she has a good chance of reaching the life expectancy of a member of the general public. 

 

However, there are many members who do not get to reach 60 and die in their early to mid fifties. (Mounties can retire after 25 years service, although with a much reduced pension.)

 

Several factors help to create that sad fact, not the least of which is the effect on the body of rotating shifts and a fractured personal & family life.   

I had this discussion with one of the Chaplains a year ago, who is attached to the Force.

 

I think that some of the newer recruits will not suffer the same fate as many now look on Policing as just a job, or a stepping stone to somewhere else.

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I like to think that we are getting healthier as time goes on, training, eating better etc.

I hopethis results in me making it into my eighties!

Maybe I am kidding myself.

Old is always 15 years older than you are!!!!

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I think it is even older than that now. 

 

I am (almost) 42 and can remember when 40 seemed ancient.  Now I don't look upon anybody in their mid 60s as being old.  Modern life and modern medicine seem to have improved general longevity.  This, however, will probably have a very detrimental effect on the country's ability to pay for our pensions!!

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I also think that one of the reasons that help today's  Police Officers face the internal & external presures of "the job", is that quite a few join the Force in their mid twenties now, after having experienced life outside the outfit in college  or in a another job.

 

I don't think that "choir practice" after the last night shift is as common now, to wash the strains away.   

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