chiefwigum

Direct entry as Inspector.

211 posts in this topic

44 minutes ago, Flat Foot said:

So when they are studying and training to gain that nationally recognised qualification, do you not see them gaining or achieving anything? When they are investigating serious crimes do you not perceive any extra responsibility?
I can understand a bit of banter but why mock and run down someone else's achievements after they've worked hard to obtain them?


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I presume that's directed at Archermav? As a career tec, you're preaching to the converted with me. 

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4 hours ago, cheese_puff said:

I presume that's directed at Archermav? As a career tec, you're preaching to the converted with me. 

Yes it was. Having worked intervention and CID for many years in multiple roles I know where the stress and pressure is highest. I will no doubt at some point go back to a DI spot again but I'll do it with a wince as part of my career development plan. It wont be for pleasure.

HMS

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11 hours ago, cheese_puff said:

Their words, not mine. Actually they also used the word 'promotion ' too. However there are still the odd few people who won't accept that going into the Dept is actually a promotion, so I didn't use it. 

A promotion usually means more money but in CID it is less, as you need to buy your own clothes. More skill……..they are always in pairs so do they only do 50% of the work each.

I laughed the other month, our old Chief Supt. came to briefing and then came and sat in the open plan office. Two CID officers walked in carrying an exhibit each……….as quick as  flash, the Chief Supt. said "I am glad you did not find 3 exhibits or there would be three of you in the office". We all laughed and CID officers never said a word…………….that was funny:clap:

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2 hours ago, Mark101 said:

A promotion usually means more money but in CID it is less, as you need to buy your own clothes. More skill……..they are always in pairs so do they only do 50% of the work each.

I laughed the other month, our old Chief Supt. came to briefing and then came and sat in the open plan office. Two CID officers walked in carrying an exhibit each……….as quick as  flash, the Chief Supt. said "I am glad you did not find 3 exhibits or there would be three of you in the office". We all laughed and CID officers never said a word…………….that was funny:clap:

Mark,

              Pairs= 50% of the work????.... I am a uniformed officer as you know... I also have the privilege of being an Inspector but I have not forgotten what being a PC or a DC or a DS is like... In my force DC's are breaking under the pressure. Stress risk assessments and mental health problems among Detectives becoming the norm. I have PCs who abandoned or were removed from the TI process on my relief and they are much happier now.

You can laugh at these people, as can your C.Supt but you and likely he have no idea what they are going through-You don't understand what they actually do.  I am not too proud to say..being a DC was much more work than I have now, less responsibility perhaps but very tiring. I look at these people with admiration not scorn. We have it easy by comparison and they should be applauded and saluted for what they do.

If their life is so easy, get on the TI process-Go enjoy that lazy gravy train with the rest of them...I double dare you.

 

HMS

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13 hours ago, HMService said:

Mark,

              Pairs= 50% of the work????.... I am a uniformed officer as you know... I also have the privilege of being an Inspector but I have not forgotten what being a PC or a DC or a DS is like... In my force DC's are breaking under the pressure. Stress risk assessments and mental health problems among Detectives becoming the norm. I have PCs who abandoned or were removed from the TI process on my relief and they are much happier now.

You can laugh at these people, as can your C.Supt but you and likely he have no idea what they are going through-You don't understand what they actually do.  I am not too proud to say..being a DC was much more work than I have now, less responsibility perhaps but very tiring. I look at these people with admiration not scorn. We have it easy by comparison and they should be applauded and saluted for what they do.

If their life is so easy, get on the TI process-Go enjoy that lazy gravy train with the rest of them...I double dare you.

 

HMS

I recall reading (a few years ago) a research report that showed that former CID officers lived much shorter lives in retirement than former uniformed officers. The conclusion was that the major step-change in the ex-CID officers' lives was the relatively placid life in retirement and, unless their former level of stress was replicated in some form of retirement activity, it could cause problems that had physical manifestations. I cannot remember where this report came from but I can well imagine that there is some truth in what it concluded. That suggests to me that HMS' comments are very near the mark.   

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My father left a CID office to voluntarily go to a rural post and promptly died aged 42. There is a lot to be said for that study OAH...


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19 hours ago, HMService said:

Mark,

              Pairs= 50% of the work????.... I am a uniformed officer as you know... I also have the privilege of being an Inspector but I have not forgotten what being a PC or a DC or a DS is like... In my force DC's are breaking under the pressure. Stress risk assessments and mental health problems among Detectives becoming the norm. I have PCs who abandoned or were removed from the TI process on my relief and they are much happier now.

You can laugh at these people, as can your C.Supt but you and likely he have no idea what they are going through-You don't understand what they actually do.  I am not too proud to say..being a DC was much more work than I have now, less responsibility perhaps but very tiring. I look at these people with admiration not scorn. We have it easy by comparison and they should be applauded and saluted for what they do.

If their life is so easy, get on the TI process-Go enjoy that lazy gravy train with the rest of them...I double dare you.

 

HMS

I have over 20yrs in the police, I worked in the Drugs squad & proactive squads many years ago, I know what it is like. I choose to go back to Response when my daughter was born as my home life was more important than my work, thank you......…….the Chief Supt.  was stating that Response officers have changed how they work (all single crewed until 9pm) but CID have not, in our Force and he is married to a DC. I never said their life was easy………...

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On 2/19/2017 at 09:29, cheese_puff said:

Their words, not mine. Actually they also used the word 'promotion ' too. However there are still the odd few people who won't accept that going into the Dept is actually a promotion, so I didn't use it. 

Seriously, promotion. So going to a Dept that was initially set up to assist uniform is now a promotion. Well I never. 

Who ever uses these words are seriously deluded. Attending a six week CID course should not by any stretch of the imagination be thought as such. In our force we've now got our Collision Investigation Officers attending such courses and achieving the accreditation. Excellent and fair play to them I say, but to then try and tell me they are promoted is way too much. Or is it only considered that if they were plain clothes and sit in the CID office? Or is the two year magic period and then you no longer are a T/DC but DC? 

I did try CID in my youthful days. More a look see from my perspective as I didn't really know what they did. Now I do, and it's not a job that I would ever want. I can see a need for them, of course I can, but there are numerous specialist depts that require extra training and studying, there is even talk of a National Accreditation for Traffic Officers, yet if you go on them are you considered promoted?

However, I can see that there are some folk on here who are sensitive over opinions, so I shall now keep em to myself. 

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It's always extremes isn't it... A Detective Constable is still a Constable. So he or she isn't promoted. However there is a lot more to being a Detective than a 6week course....

So to say they are only a PC is also untrue. They hold experience and formal qualifications that are at least as hard as promotion to PS is to obtain.

Many road crash investigators achieve that accreditation too for good reason.

But we so often default to type- if it's an achievement or qualification that I don't have then it isn't much anyway. If it's a department I don't work on then they are lazy overpaid and of limited use.

"Everyone knows intervention is the hardest"
"Everyone knows CID have to fix the crap work intervention do"
"Everyone knows squads are places for job dodgers and people who never go out"
"Work in pairs because they do half one job apiece"

Been there done it and I can say it's all bullshit - everybody is stressed and tired and overworked and there are very few cushy spots anywhere anymore.

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I am an MOP with a bit of (now rapidly ageing) Police perspective. So, here's my view:

A warranted officer is a warranted officer - all the same, irrespective of rank, when the sh#t hits the fan, I expect them all to do the same thing - take action! I once patrolled with the then Chief Superintendent George Rushbrook, on a Sunday morning along the Bayswater Road. George Rushbrook retired as a Commander and was rated in a book, "The Signs of Crime", as one of the most practical detectives in the Met. He was also a really nice bloke. During that Sunday patrol, one of the many things he said was " it doesn't matter who you are in The Job, what matters is what you do". I think that about sums up how I see policing - rank really isn't the issue but what an individual actually achieves is what is important. So Response / CID / Specialist Squads are not so important (particularly to the end-user - Joe & Josephine Public); they would like to see more blue suits with shiny buttons and pointed hats on the streets (with body armour but probably without lime-green or similar hued jackets etc). That's really what policing is about - and has been since 1829 when "the first objective to be obtained is the prevention of crime"!

For what it's worth, this is just a view from a man who once rode on The Clapham Omnibus  :tongue_cheek:

 

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On ‎20‎/‎02‎/‎2017 at 18:17, Mark101 said:

I have over 20yrs in the police, I worked in the Drugs squad & proactive squads many years ago, I know what it is like. I choose to go back to Response when my daughter was born as my home life was more important than my work, thank you......…….the Chief Supt.  was stating that Response officers have changed how they work (all single crewed until 9pm) but CID have not, in our Force and he is married to a DC. I never said their life was easy………...

But if you go back you will only have half the work to do as they work in twos? Go fill your boots! :P

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