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Maverick22

Water Cannon

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I think it was more a political decision than a practical one. Theresa May doesn't like Boris and likes police officers even less. The chances of her implementing something which might actually protect police officers was remote indeed. 

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I keep seeing a comment from a London assemble member saying that the water cannon only had a shelf life of 2 - 3 years.  If that is the case then why buy them in the first place and what determines their shelf life?

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Water cannon only had a shelf-life of 2-3 years?

 

In what context?  In terms of how much money they could afford into maintenance, one presumes, because, like any other machine as long as you can get replacement parts for the bits that wear out, it'll keep going and going and going............

 

I went to a farm show the other day and there was a steam engine on display that was a million years old - and it was still going strong.

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Water cannon only had a shelf-life of 2-3 years?

 

In what context?  In terms of how much money they could afford into maintenance, one presumes, because, like any other machine as long as you can get replacement parts for the bits that wear out, it'll keep going and going and going............

 

I went to a farm show the other day and there was a steam engine on display that was a million years old - and it was still going strong.

I don't understand where the comment comes from given that most machines can be repaired and maintained.  

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Water cannon only had a shelf-life of 2-3 years?

 

In what context?  In terms of how much money they could afford into maintenance, one presumes, because, like any other machine as long as you can get replacement parts for the bits that wear out, it'll keep going and going and going............

 

I went to a farm show the other day and there was a steam engine on display that was a million years old - and it was still going strong.

 

Is it a genuine comment for these to have a shelf life or is it propoganda to make Boris look foolish and wasted money?

 

To my untrained eye (in construction of water cannons) it seems a fairly simple machine:- holding tank+ lots of water+ decent pump+ hoses & seals & valve. I don't suppose the engine and running gear will have covered many hard miles. Motor that drives the pump may need a recon? I don't know.

 

Perhaps the 2-3 year shelf life is because they don't put rust inhibitor in the tank ;)

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The shelf life comment was a rough estimate of the vehicle's life which was given back in 2013. Given that the vehicles were 23 years old then, I guess they assumed a life expectancy of 25 years old in total.

They can obviously be repaired but maybe it becomes uneconomic after a certain amount of time. They apparently need significant amounts of work to bring them up to scratch.

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Any mechanical machine needs maintainence so what is the problem. Think of the shelf life of a fire tender, I have known some ancient machines that have been fully serviceable.

They would probably be cheaper and you can direct the hoses manually. :smile:

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Water cannon only had a shelf-life of 2-3 years?

 

In what context?  In terms of how much money they could afford into maintenance, one presumes, because, like any other machine as long as you can get replacement parts for the bits that wear out, it'll keep going and going and going............

 

I went to a farm show the other day and there was a steam engine on display that was a million years old - and it was still going strong.

That's as maybe ITYO, but I don't think it would do as good a job as a water cannon, do you :tongue_cheek:

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In which case why do we replace our own cars, why not just keep using them from 25-50 years ago?

 

Because, as you know, at some point it becomes uneconomical to maintain them.  Although I would also assume that they have a total cost of ownership and they are disposed of to fulfil some accountancy 'rules'.

I've never heard the term 'shelf life' used to describe the lifespan of a police vehicle, or any other vehicle.  I've heard it used in the terms of a can of peaches......

 

 

Boris has bought some water cannon.  They are, presumably, moth-balled awaiting a refit/maintenance - they are hardly likely to turn to dust in 3 years, any more than they will in 10, so the term 'shelf-life' is ridiculous.  Unless, of course, the indidivual who made the 'shelf life' comment happens to know that in 2-3 years all the replacement parts will have been used up - what with their obvious extensive knowledge of water cannon supplies, operation and maintenance, that is.

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In which case why do we replace our own cars, why not just keep using them from 25-50 years ago?

 

............and I would imagine pretty much every other car on the road would outrun us...........and we'd have to find some way of retrofitting seat belts to the rear of a few of them, before we put prisoners in them.  Also, the engines would need adapting for unleaded fuel..........I don't think they had too many diesel police cars in those days.........they'd handle like a bag of crap too. 

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I've just re read the PO article and it was Mark Rowley the Met's  assistant commissioner who said the water cannon had a limited shelf life.

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Because, as you know, at some point it becomes uneconomical to maintain them.  Although I would also assume that they have a total cost of ownership and they are disposed of to fulfil some accountancy 'rules'.

I've never heard the term 'shelf life' used to describe the lifespan of a police vehicle, or any other vehicle.  I've heard it used in the terms of a can of peaches......

 

 

Boris has bought some water cannon.  They are, presumably, moth-balled awaiting a refit/maintenance - they are hardly likely to turn to dust in 3 years, any more than they will in 10, so the term 'shelf-life' is ridiculous.  Unless, of course, the indidivual who made the 'shelf life' comment happens to know that in 2-3 years all the replacement parts will have been used up - what with their obvious extensive knowledge of water cannon supplies, operation and maintenance, that is.

 

 

............and I would imagine pretty much every other car on the road would outrun us...........and we'd have to find some way of retrofitting seat belts to the rear of a few of them, before we put prisoners in them.  Also, the engines would need adapting for unleaded fuel..........I don't think they had too many diesel police cars in those days.........they'd handle like a bag of crap too. 

 

I'm trying to think of some parallel universe where I'd want to put prisoners in my own car, but as I can't I'll move on.

 

You make an excellent point about after a certain point it becomes uneconomical to maintain them. So maybe this is the same with these water cannons. They are Police vehicles so clearly they aren't going to explode in a cloud of dust, however it may be that they have a suggested life span after which it may become too expensive to maintain them. Or maybe they have to fulfil some 'accountancy rules'? No-one is suggesting that they are going to turn to dust. Old Spitfires don't turn to dust and they don't get used a huge amount but it's very expensive to keep them flying. Same with old cars, even if they aren't used much. 

 

I don't get your tin of peaches analogy, you say they have a shelf life but as far as I am aware they also don't just explode after their sell by, it's just a recommended date after which it's suggested not to eat them. (They don't in my house). So, quite similar really to water cannons. 

 

No-one is expecting them to fall apart after three years, it's highly likely they'll keep on going for years. However I'm presuming they put an economic lifespan on virtually everything, for various reasons; capital depreciation, maintenance, efficiency etc. I would imagine that's it's the same here. 

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It only becomes uneconomical to maintain vehicles when they've been used so much the major bits start to wear out. That won't be the case with these things. Unless they've just seized up with rust through lack of use.   

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