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toffeewrapper

Demands on the police

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Below is a press release from the COP

 

 

 

First analysis of national demand on policing published printButton.png emailButton.png College Of Policing - College Press Releases Written by Natalie Davison (Natalie.Davison@college.pnn.police.uk)    Thursday, 22 January 2015
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The first national picture of the breadth and complexity of the work undertaken by the police has been published by the College of Policing today.

The analysis shows the incoming and ongoing work of the police and suggests an increasing amount of police time is directed towards public protection work such as  managing high-risk offenders and protecting victims who are at risk and often vulnerable.

These cases are often extremely challenging and rightly require considerable amounts of police resource.

The analysis shows in the past five years the number of police officers has fallen by 11 per cent. On a typical day in a typical force there is approximately one officer on duty for every 1,753 people living in a force area.

On a typical day, officers in that force will make 50 arrests, deal with 101 anti-social behaviour incidents, respond to approximately 12 missing person reports, carry out 37 stop and searches, deal with 9 road traffic collisions, and respond to 14 incidents flagged as being linked to mental health issues.

In addition to reacting to calls for service from the public, the police service will also be supporting 2,700 families enrolled in the troubled families programme, supporting approximately 1,600 domestic abuse victims, 1,000 children subject to Child Protection Plans and managing 1,189 sexual and violent offenders in partnership with other local bodies.

The College of Policing analysis indicates there are emerging pressures on police resilience – namely decreased levels of police visibility and increasing requests for mutual aid. It also shows that incidents involving people with mental health issues appear to be increasing.

In some forces, public safety and concern for welfare incidents now represent the largest category of recorded incidents.
 

 

 But remember .............. Auntie Teresa says   we need to do more with less. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

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 But remember .............. Auntie Teresa says   we need to do more with less. 

And that our number 1 priority is crime, nothing more, nothing less.

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I am curious if there is a similar report done on other nation's police forces, like Canada or Australia, for comparison?

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Croby I don't know nut would be surpised if it were not so. It is blaantly obvious that the Police Service cannot sustain the cuts in personnel that it have been enforced in various methods.  With the plethora of Legislation it takes huge swathes of time just to keep up to date. I know that I was held to be highly up to date and in keeping with legislation, but now after just a couple of years I am grossly out of date. Mind you I don't get the Police Publications now to keep me up to date. I can now wallow in my ignorance of legislation, but the basics of Policing remain the same.

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And that our number 1 priority is crime, nothing more, nothing less.

 

I was just about to say the same.  I'm not totally sure that she has a clue what we do - other than cost her money.

 

Mispers must cost us a fortune - especially when they're kids from 'secure' accomodation.............so because they can't afford to employ enough staff, we have to spend hours and hours finding kids who don't want to be found.

 

And let's not even think about how long we (and the public) end up waiting around for ambulances these days........

 

Ah well.  Nothing we can do but piss and moan.............we are good at that.....

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Mispers must cost us a fortune - especially when they're kids from 'secure' accomodation.............so because they can't afford to employ enough staff, we have to spend hours and hours finding kids who don't want to be found.

 

Don't forget we return them they are accepted at the front door and go straight out of the rear door as we drive away. And the secure home staff say "We cannot touch them" Bloody social services. :angry:

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One officer on duty for every 1753 people living in a force area.  Its frightening really and the population is still growing at a rapid rate. So by the end of the month that will probably every 2000.

Do more with less, were all in this together.

 

She can go kiss my sisters black cats a**e

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One officer on duty for every 1753 people living in a force area.  Its frightening really and the population is still growing at a rapid rate. So by the end of the month that will probably every 2000.

Do more with less, were all in this together.

 

She can go kiss my sisters black cats a**e

Toffeewrapper as we are both GMP and Ex GMP I think you would agree that one officer for every 1753 would be incorrect in our case. Perhaps you could even do that. As an Inspector it was like knitting sawdust or platting fog sometimes. :angry:

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One officer on duty for every 1753 people living in a force area.  Its frightening really and the population is still growing at a rapid rate. So by the end of the month that will probably every 2000.

Do more with less, were all in this together.

 

She can go kiss my sisters black cats a**e

I hope you have the dosh to cover the vet bills for poisoning... :shock3:

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We are sharing the demands with Specials………….. we now have Special commanders who can act as Bronzes.

Mad!!!!

And yes, although I do like the people who are specials, I think they take jobs & overtime from Cops. Sorry but that's my opinion.

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We are sharing the demands with Specials………….. we now have Special commanders who can act as Bronzes. 

The trouble is very few specials are actually competent or are interested/experienced enough to do more than basic duties.  Whilst I admire their dedication to do the same job as I do unpaid and on top of their normal careers, most don't do enough hours to build up a high level of competence, so they are not a resource that can be used to replace full time bobbies in demanding situations.  I've heard rumours that my force wants to get three PSU serials to do football duties as well as policing the night time economy.  

 

Demand is increasing and becoming more varied and on the whole is best met by full time, experienced PCs.   

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