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Silver plated

Marine guilty of murder

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It's a shame there was not similar justice given to the victims murdered by members of the parachute regiment on Bloody Sunday 1972.

 

As an Anglo-Irish Roman Catholic, I doubt that the situation you refer to was in any way, shape or form similar to what occurred in Afghanistan. The role of the IRA's local commander has never been truly exposed - mainly because he is now a politician and we all know that politicians are Teflon-coated!

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Silver Plated.

 

As one who was actually there on the day, (not in the Parachute Regiment I hasten to add, but close enough) 

 

I feel the comments may be tainted by innuendo, hearsay and downright fishwives gossip boosted by Chinese whispers. The difference between the two situations are incomparable, exactly as outlined by OAH.

 

I have no doubts or worries about the penalty handed down to the Ex Marine who killed the insurgent, even if he would have died anyway, he should not have shot him. End of!

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I'm sure that if the situation had been reversed the Taliban would have complied with the Geneva Convention.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

I would have preferred if the Marines had been tried by a Civil Crown Court, the verdict would in all probabilities have been the same, but I have never had much faith in Courts Martial

having read many reports of them, and the number of cases criticised by the Appeal Court.

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It was utterley stupid of a Marine to keep a copy of the footage on his computer, but that marine walked away, and with his colleague returned to his unit.

The act was foolish and wrong, and if correct must have been punished.

I fully take the point about Courts Martial, they are not independent in any way. I believe that at a Civil Crown Court, there would have been enough reasonable doubt for a more than 50/50 chance of aquital. I feel that no person would have been able to say that the Taliban was not already dead, and that the Sergeant tastelessly, and foolishly shown an act of bravado in shooting a dead body.

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Is there an appeals process for courts martial?

Yes, they usually end up in the Court of Appeal(Civil Division).   Because Courts Martial are like Kangaroo Courts, they usually end up at the Appeal Court.

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Surely if the side you are fighting does not conform to the Geneva Convention , neither should you ?

What's the point of the Geneva Convention, then?

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Personally, I couldn't care less that this enemy of my country was killed or in what circumstance. As said in the film, it's nothing he wouldn't have done to one of us. One more dead terrorist who won't be killing anymore of ours.

What concerns me is what I am hearing from old colleagues about this. That the country has sold out one of its own, who put life and limb on the line, day in day out, over several campaign deployments. That they now consider it better to pull back from a fight than go forward, because even if you don't end up dead or crippled, your own country will second guess every decision you make and seek to crucify you, in the name of good publicity.

The job of the soldier is and always has been "to close with and kill the enemy". As was once said " this isn't a form of aggressive camping".

Much as whenever I hear of an armed criminal getting shot by us, it registers at no emotional level whatsoever. These are the sort of people who applaud when cops are killed or injured. The only people I feel sorry for are the poor sods who have to face the inevitable IPCC witch hunt because they did their job and stopped a violent criminal. As far as I'm concerned, all this verdict has done is further weakened this country, further weakened the morale of its fighting troops and further make me ask whether anything I' did in the services or in the police was ever worth it. I'm rapidly coming to the conclusion that it wasn't.

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Many high ranking Army Officers are asking that the Court is lenient with the soldier.  They say that the average person(including some of those on the Board of the Enquiry) has no idea what it is like to be fighting in Afghanistan with 'one arm tied behind your back',  and the severe pressures the men are under.  The only good Talaban is a dead one, most people probably don't care how they are disposed of.

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There is no excuse for what this marine did. I can't believe that people on here are trying to defend his actions

You misunderstand the general gist I think. I don't think anyone would disagree that he broke the law. It's written in black and white. You can't shoot terrorists who are no longer a threat. You have to respect their human rights and obey the Geneva Convention. There is no ambiguity.

The point being made is that my personal belief is that the law is wrong. An individual such as this who would kill, maim and torture our troops, kill, torture and maim innocent civilians does not deserve the protection afforded to those of any nationality who put on a uniform, pick up a weapon and fight for a national cause with honour. This terrorist was fighting to ensure the continued enslavement of those who do not follow their religion, the degradation of women, the ability to flood our streets with opiates and the ability to kill anyone, young or old who disagreed with their nazi like interpretation of what is a peaceful religion.

There is every mitigation for what this RM Commando did. Research some of the stress, horror and danger they had been subjected to daily, in the service of our country. They fight the war there, to keep the enemy from fighting the war on our streets here.

This wasn't torture. This was the simple disposal of a threat, a terrorist who had proven themselves a deadly threat and would have continued to do so if allowed.

To place a judgement on what took place from the safety old blighty, behind a keyboard, safe and warm in the protection of our service personnel is at best naive. Tired, exhausted, dirty, under constant deadly threat, fighting in some pretty savage hand to hand engagements, at close quarters, in an environment where the enemy could be miles away or stood right next to you in a crop field. Knowing that every step you take could detonate an IED that at best, rips your legs off with shrapnel, smashing bone and tearing muscle. That's where you should have to be before you judge them by another set of values.

I repeat, they killed a terrorist on a battlefield. I shed no tears nor will lose a second sleep over it. I will feel aggrieved and demoralised on behalf of someone who served their country, and was then sold out by that country, in the name of rules which only we seem to obey.

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