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PSNI Transferee Recruitment

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The PSNI is looking for transferee Constables and D/Constables.

Before you consider applying, a word of warning:

The reason for this latest round of transferee recruitment (designed to plug the skill gap left by mass redundancies in the wake of the RUC's destruction) is being implemented to replace transferees who have arrived here in the last 12 months and have already left or, are in the process of leaving.

Over the past year or so, approximately 50 uniformed constables transferred to the PSNI from Mainland Forces, most coming because they liked what was advertised in the PSNI's glossy corporate literature, most of which is stage-managed and wholly fictitious. Promises of good promotion prospects and other excellent opportunities, oh my!

Of those 50 officers, over 20 have already transferred back to Mainland forces and a significant proportion of those still here are either off on long term sick (because they realise they've been duped) and/or in the process of transferring out of the PSNI. The same thing happened in 2008/9 with a batch of transferee D/Sergeants & D/Inspectors (I remember bumping into one D/Sgt who had been on the ground for just 3 weeks before realising he'd made a dreadful mistake!).

Every single one of them that I've spoken to is absolutely flabbergasted with the inefficient and backward nature of this force and the bullying management culture and I cannot name one who thinks they've made the right move.

Trust me, you're better off staying where you are. There are no promotion opportunities here (unless you belong to the closed group around which the PSNI was born out of the RUC's ashes). There has not been a Con-Sgt promotion competition since 2008 and over 100 people already on the list will have to sit the exams again. There is no sign of this happening anytime soon. Other opportunities are scarce and will depend more on who you know than what skills base you have.

Don't take my word alone, do a bit of digging and you'll see for yourself.

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Sounds a bit bitter if you ask me...

Perhaps that comment is because you have no knowledge of the PSNI. It is not the first time I have heard comments the same as that, and I have spoken to many preseent serving officers and also many old RUC officers.

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The PSNI is looking for transferee Constables and D/Constables.

Before you consider applying, a word of warning:

The reason for this latest round of transferee recruitment (designed to plug the skill gap left by mass redundancies in the wake of the RUC's destruction) is being implemented to replace transferees who have arrived here in the last 12 months and have already left or, are in the process of leaving.

Over the past year or so, approximately 50 uniformed constables transferred to the PSNI from Mainland Forces, most coming because they liked what was advertised in the PSNI's glossy corporate literature, most of which is stage-managed and wholly fictitious. Promises of good promotion prospects and other excellent opportunities, oh my!

Of those 50 officers, over 20 have already transferred back to Mainland forces and a significant proportion of those still here are either off on long term sick (because they realise they've been duped) and/or in the process of transferring out of the PSNI. The same thing happened in 2008/9 with a batch of transferee D/Sergeants & D/Inspectors (I remember bumping into one D/Sgt who had been on the ground for just 3 weeks before realising he'd made a dreadful mistake!).

Every single one of them that I've spoken to is absolutely flabbergasted with the inefficient and backward nature of this force and the bullying management culture and I cannot name one who thinks they've made the right move.

Trust me, you're better off staying where you are. There are no promotion opportunities here (unless you belong to the closed group around which the PSNI was born out of the RUC's ashes). There has not been a Con-Sgt promotion competition since 2008 and over 100 people already on the list will have to sit the exams again. There is no sign of this happening anytime soon. Other opportunities are scarce and will depend more on who you know than what skills base you have.

Don't take my word alone, do a bit of digging and you'll see for yourself.

Okay...

Anyone considering applying to transfer to the PSNI should think very carefully about the decision. However, I think the points made here are exaggerated and I'd agree with a previous poster that they sound a little bitter. Firstly, the PSNI is different to mainland forces and policing in Northern Ireland is different to policing in England, Scotland and Wales. I think this is quite obvious to most people. Those who came over without properly researching the place and knowing what they were signing up for, well, I've no sympathy for them.

Opportunities in the PSNI. The OP states that there are none. Apart from nearly limitless overtime in some districts, extra pay allowance, no Winsor reforms, a strong federation and a continuation of pay increments. Promotions are to resume in 2014 when many middle-ranking officers are set to retire. All officers are also armed, which some might see as a benefit.

The PSNI is certainly more traditional than other forces, probably owing to the years of integration with the military during the Troubles. Inefficient? Possibly. But remember that the challenges of policing are so vastly different in some parts of Northern Ireland. As for there being no opportunity for anyone outside the 'RUC club', this is utter nonsense. I don't even know where to start with that point.

I personally know transferees who seem to be enjoying their new jobs here. Maybe things are different in other stations and districts, but from what I have heard the majority who have left have done so because they hadn't fully understood the security risks associated with being a Police officer here. You are under threat all the time. This, understandably, does not suit everyone.

The PSNI is a good force to work for. It has its problems, but it also has its merits. However, I don't really think transferees are the best way to swell the ranks. It's just too much to get used to.

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In all fairness any Police force will have it's issues! However I had to do a job with the PSNI and found that A) Cops are cops and it wasn't that hard to feel at home (other than the memorials on the stairs) and ...... B)The PSNI were super slick and super helpful. By far and away the best force I have ever seen - far better than my own.

I have expressed an interest and await my application! It's a big job to take on BUT I feel like I have done MOST of what can be done within my own force and the PSNI really do feel like the real Police.

PSNI old sweats have told me to give it a run and that I would enjoy it which makes me hopefull but the thing is until you have done it it's very hard to know if it's for you.

I still remember this long tooth DC saying to me "in a way it's the most dangerous time to be in the Police here. Because things have been much better we just don't take as much care of our safety". That made me think!

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Perhaps that comment is because you have no knowledge of the PSNI. It is not the first time I have heard comments the same as that, and I have spoken to many preseent serving officers and also many old RUC officers.

I am afraid you are incorrect. I served my time in the PSNI, before transferring to an, ahem, 'mainland' force.

Loved my time there, and went in eyes open having lived there, and experienced the terrorist first hand through my family. It is a job to get used to, and any prospective transferee should heed notbrazil's advice. The camaraderie I believe is second to none, and the method of policing, i.e. on a DCU and Station level is great as you really get to know your own area, the 'personalities', its foibles, and the do's and don'ts. Yes, the PSNI does have its niggles, however they are trying to provide a neighbourhood policing style as well as keeping one foot in the counter-terrorism and public order fight.

When the timing is right with my family, I will be seeking to return.

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I am afraid you are incorrect. I served my time in the PSNI, before transferring to an, ahem, 'mainland' force.

Loved my time there, and went in eyes open having lived there, and experienced the terrorist first hand through my family. It is a job to get used to, and any prospective transferee should heed notbrazil's advice. The camaraderie I believe is second to none, and the method of policing, i.e. on a DCU and Station level is great as you really get to know your own area, the 'personalities', its foibles, and the do's and don'ts. Yes, the PSNI does have its niggles, however they are trying to provide a neighbourhood policing style as well as keeping one foot in the counter-terrorism and public order fight.

When the timing is right with my family, I will be seeking to return.

Sorry.... When you say "experienced the terrorist first hand through your family" can you elaborate a bit (as long as it doesn't cause you problems)! I am looking to join so would like to have a strong knowledge of what's its all about?!

Also...are you originally from N.I?? Any ideas what's thought of outsiders joining the PSNI? I have read different things about it! Any extra danger to having an English accent in the PSNI in terms of targeting by Terrorists/aggro when dealing with suspects??

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To eleborate I would be coming across witha third of my service and a fair amount of experience so have general knowledge of Police work/life etc!! Just want the NI specifics!!!

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Any extra danger to having an English accent in the PSNI in terms of targeting by Terrorists/aggro when dealing with suspects??

No, there are loads of people with English, Scottish, Welsh accents in the PSNI. There aren't many shifts that don't have at least one.

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Sounds a bit bitter if you ask me...

Bitter? Yes. If you had upped sticks and moved to find that you had been sold a crock of shite, you would be too.

NotBrazil: "The PSNI is certainly more traditional than other forces, probably owing to the years of integration with the military during the Troubles. Inefficient? Possibly. But remember that the challenges of policing are so vastly different in some parts of Northern Ireland. As for there being no opportunity for anyone outside the 'RUC club', this is utter nonsense. I don't even know where to start with that point."

By "more traditional" do you really mean "backwards"? That would be the majority view.

I did not say that there was no opportunity for anyone outside the "RUC" club, quite the contrary, there are those in senior positions who have tried to eradicate all vestiges of the RUC, some publicly lying about loss of funding for the RUC Athletic Assoc' if it didn't ditch the RUC name and logo or, have you conveniently forgotten this?

What I actually said was "There are no promotion opportunities here (unless you belong to the closed group around which the PSNI was born out of the RUC's ashes)." That "closed group" being those who positioned themselves in positions of power and influence in the then infant PSNI. You must walk around with your eyes closed.

The challenges of policing some parts of NI are very different to those you might find elsewhere in the UK but, that doesn't make them any more difficult. Nor does it excuse the PSNI's backwards approach or refusal to adopt proven good practice from elsewhere.

I used to work in one of those "challenging" areas and grew tired of listening to people using the security situation as an excuse for all sorts of things.

Notwithstanding the underlying terrorist threat, out colleagues in places like Liverpool, Manchester a Nottingham, where gun and knife crime is far higher than anywhere in NI, are probably leading just as perilous working lives.

Twohopes2012: "Also...are you originally from N.I?? Any ideas what's thought of outsiders joining the PSNI? I have read different things about it! Any extra danger to having an English accent in the PSNI in terms of targeting by Terrorists/aggro when dealing with suspects??"

When working in a nationalist area, I actually found being a "foreigner" to be advantageous. I wasn't associated with any of the problems endemic in NI and often found that those traditionally suspicious of police would rather speak to me than my local colleagues. However, I would be lying if I said that I have never experienced anti-English racism both at work and off duty.

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"there are those in senior positions who have tried to eradicate all vestiges of the RUC, some publicly lying about loss of funding for the RUC Athletic Assoc' if it didn't ditch the RUC name and logo"

This was put to a ballot of members and retaining the RUC name and symbol passed with flying colours.

"The challenges of policing some parts of NI are very different to those you might find elsewhere in the UK but, that doesn't make them any more difficult"

When you can't go to a domestic without six officers, two armoured Land Rovers and two carrying sub machine guns, I think you'll find that it can be "more difficult".

You've obviously had bad experiences in NI, I hope you have found happiness elsewhere. But don't pretend that your opinions represent the majority view - Northern Ireland is not Hampshire and the policing practices that work on the mainland would not work here. If you fail to understand that, I'm not surprised you didn't get on too well in the PSNI.

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"there are those in senior positions who have tried to eradicate all vestiges of the RUC, some publicly lying about loss of funding for the RUC Athletic Assoc' if it didn't ditch the RUC name and logo"

This was put to a ballot of members and retaining the RUC name and symbol passed with flying colours.

"The challenges of policing some parts of NI are very different to those you might find elsewhere in the UK but, that doesn't make them any more difficult"

When you can't go to a domestic without six officers, two armoured Land Rovers and two carrying sub machine guns, I think you'll find that it can be "more difficult".

You've obviously had bad experiences in NI, I hope you have found happiness elsewhere. But don't pretend that your opinions represent the majority view - Northern Ireland is not Hampshire and the policing practices that work on the mainland would not work here. If you fail to understand that, I'm not surprised you didn't get on too well in the PSNI.

I'm still in the PSNI. I understand that you are not?

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