WalterWitrty

Is Being A PCSO A Full Time Job?

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I've been researching PCSOs ever since David Cameron went back on his promise to increase the police force by 20,000. In fact doing the exact opposite. Since the only thing forces are now hiring is PCSOs I've been looking at them. Though their job is far less than a real officer and they are limit in their powers. One thing struck me, they get paid 21,000 a year. From my understanding, thats close to a normal PCs pay.

If PSCOs are being paid so much, it makes me think. Is it a full time job or part time?

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I believe it can be either full time or part time. But if you work half the hours you get half the pay.

You'll see adverts for many jobs quoting "FTE", which is "full time equivalent" - eg salary will be reduced depending on the number of hours being done compared with the number of hours required for a full time post.

As for that salary, I suspect that's the top end of the scale - I believe they start on around £16k (unless in London, who probably get more).

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Most forces I've looked at are above 20k.

Have to decide in a few months, do a criminology degree and get thousands in debt. Or if I get paid a good amount as a PSCO, get experience then apply to join as a constable.

We have now a few years back log on recruitment. When it opens up the competition will be fierce. Need something to stand out from the crowd. If PSCO is full time, happy days. I get experience and pay. Only downside is for the most part, looking like a park warden haha.

In fact, heres a question to anyone who knows. Whats more valuable, an honours degree in criminology or three years as a PSCO.

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Most forces I've looked at are above 20k.

Have to decide in a few months, do a criminology degree and get thousands in debt. Or if I get paid a good amount as a PSCO, get experience then apply to join as a constable.

We have now a few years back log on recruitment. When it opens up the competition will be fierce. Need something to stand out from the crowd. If PSCO is full time, happy days. I get experience and pay. Only downside is for the most part, looking like a park warden haha.

In fact, heres a question to anyone who knows. Whats more valuable, an honours degree in criminology or three years as a PSCO.

Hmmm. Have you not been reading the news? At your stage I would be considering a different sort of education entirely. Medical doctor, dentist, accountant, architect etc.

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I was going to go into medicine, then spent a few weeks at a hospital. Not my ideal environment. But I've wanted to join the force for years.

Doing a medical degree does seem like the best option but I cannot get away from something that I love. Wanted to be in the police since I was five.

Where there is a will there is a way, police recruitment seems bleak for the future. But it still does not mean its impossible to get into.

In fact from reading many medical reports, I've seen the worst of the worst being broadcasted on many issues. Conditions change all the time, some for the worst and some for the better. Just because the winsor report looks horrible on context, does not mean it will become reality.

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Revron, if you are clever enough to study medicine, do your criminology degree then apply to get parachuted in as an Inspector or Superintendent post-Winsor 2!

Seriously though, the degree won't have any bearing on an application to become a PC, unless the force you're thinking of applying to has a separate graduate entry scheme. It's not worth incurring the debt if you don't actually need the degree for your job. Experience and (above all) really good examples on your application form and at interview are your best tools.

Also, many forces are only recruiting internally these days, so being a PCSO would give you an advantage. You could study in your spare time if you don't have too many other commitments.

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Revron, if you are clever enough to study medicine, do your criminology degree then apply to get parachuted in as an Inspector or Superintendent post-Winsor 2!

Seriously though, the degree won't have any bearing on an application to become a PC, unless the force you're thinking of applying to has a separate graduate entry scheme. It's not worth incurring the debt if you don't actually need the degree for your job. Experience and (above all) really good examples on your application form and at interview are your best tools.

Also, many forces are only recruiting internally these days, so being a PCSO would give you an advantage. You could study in your spare time if you don't have too many other commitments.

I would hate a career that is mostly office work. Now I understand a normal officer needs to do quite a bit. But I am fine with that. I have never planned on moving above Sgt, for the simple fact is I like the idea of frontline work too much.

My only goal right now is to enter the service as a constable, my dilemma is though that I need to shine out among all the other applicants. The only question is, what’s better for hiring? Experience as a PCSO or Criminology Degree.

The more I learn about the force, the higher the montain is to climb to even reach the begining of ranks in the force.

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The criminology degree is probably a better bet for hiring, but if you make it clear that you are using it as a springboard for furtherence, then it may not make you popular in the rank and file, who in the main want people to further themselves on ability, rather than qualifications.

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I would hate a career that is mostly office work. Now I understand a normal officer needs to do quite a bit. But I am fine with that. I have never planned on moving above Sgt, for the simple fact is I like the idea of frontline work too much.

My only goal right now is to enter the service as a constable, my dilemma is though that I need to shine out among all the other applicants. The only question is, what’s better for hiring? Experience as a PCSO or Criminology Degree.

The more I learn about the force, the higher the montain is to climb to even reach the begining of ranks in the force.

Why do you want to join the police then? One arrest and you then have in the region of five hours paperwork. You will soon find you are doing more office work than patrolling.

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Why do you want to join the police then? One arrest and you then have in the region of five hours paperwork. You will soon find you are doing more office work than patrolling.

Completely true and I accept that fact. But I want in the force not for the money or the nice postion but for the fact of doing something first hand. I might spend most of my time in an office working on cases, but the fact of being on patrol, even for a short while is enough to keep me happy.

Plus its the end result that matters at the end of the day. If I have to spend 5 hours doing paper work to end in a conviction. Thats another massive plus side to paper work.

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Completely true and I accept that fact. But I want in the force not for the money or the nice postion but for the fact of doing something first hand. I might spend most of my time in an office working on cases, but the fact of being on patrol, even for a short while is enough to keep me happy.

Plus its the end result that matters at the end of the day. If I have to spend 5 hours doing paper work to end in a conviction. Thats another massive plus side to paper work.

Unless things have changed in the last few years, you will never find out. The CPS never sent back results. That can be soul destroying.

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The criminology degree is probably a better bet for hiring, but if you make it clear that you are using it as a springboard for furtherence, then it may not make you popular in the rank and file, who in the main want people to further themselves on ability, rather than qualifications.

The question is though, how applicable is it in real police work. I'm doing my education in health, I've worked at hospitals. Most of the stuff I learn does not count for anything. Its useless to be honest (except for anatomy, highly useful)

I know being in the force even as a PSCO would gain me more experience than talking about theorys all day. My only concern is though, how would it look to a recruitment officer.

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And the five hours spent doing your utmost to secure a conviction, could be 5 hours wasted. The CPS acts in mysterious ways.

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Unless things have changed in the last few years, you will never find out. The CPS never sent back results. That can be soul destroying.

The only thing we can do is have faith in the justice system....

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And the five hours spent doing your utmost to secure a conviction, could be 5 hours wasted. The CPS acts in mysterious ways.

I guess its the fact you give it your all that matters. Thats the only thing that can give some peace of mind.

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