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Neljorpa

few considerations and questions about "police interceptors"

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As Italian police officer (and so European) I am interested to see how is the work of other European police enforcements and I became passionate to watch the series "police interceptor" when I see it on Sky Channel - Italy

The vision of the scenes has given me some doubts about the authenticity of the events but also gave to me a sense of solidarity, enthusiasm and almost envy.

First I found that many rules of the road in Great Britain and Italy are almost identical with regard to the obligations, but differ in the nature and extent of the sanctions. I have understood that in Britain you have a lot of criminal offenses, which can lead to the arrest immediately. In Italy most of the traffic violations have administrative nature and the procedure concludes with the payment of money within 60 days from this assessment.

Secondly, the doubts about the authenticity of some scenes comes from the fact that the policemen seem to deal with emergencies and potentially dangerous persons with too much tranquility, especially if we consider that they have a television troupe with them to protect.

Alpha

In particular, I am afraid that the Policemen are working without guns in critical condition. It 's a known fact that the police in Britain during normal service does not have guns in tow, but one thing is to know it and another thing is to see it directly. Let me be clear about it: in Italy even though we have supplied by guns while we are in normal services policemen are not gunslingers (neither city police nor the state police, nor the Carabinieri). I personally have never fired a single shot in service in a 12-year career (only shoots during practice at the range) and I have extracted the gun from the holster only one time. Anyway I think that to have a pistol on hip during a critical situation features a kind of safety idea even if you don’t remove it from its holster.

Perhaps all is due to the higher level of civilization that the general british people has than us.

Instead I am envious of the enormous equipment supplied to the police station which is shown from the TV series: a lot of cars, helicopters, computerized information systems available on the time during road checks, etc..

In conclusion, my question is the following:

Does the series "Police Interceptors" well describe the day of service of a Great Britain patrol dedicated to traffic controls?

Gabriele

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The problem with 'fly on the wall' type documentaries is, they may be altered to give a different perception as to what happened at the time in a particular scene, merely by editing the video footage afterwards. Otherwise it may not make for exciting television, all the boring stuff is edited out.

Whilst it is generally accurate, up to a point, there is a lot that happens afterwards that the public don't get to see and don't fully appreciate the vast amount of paperwork that entails following an arrest. That's the boring stuff.

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I would like to add that one episode of Interceptors is probably made up of several weeks of film, edited to make it look like we rush about all day every day getting great results.

We do get good results using the technology we have, but sometimes nothing happens and we drive about getting involved in very little.

For the record, I work in a force that has no helicopter, so I have no idea what it is like to have a vehicle pursuit with air support.

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With regard to our "tranquillity"... I know it looks unrealistic but that is really how we are here.

 

The British public have very little idea how "robust" the Police response is to aggression overseas. Many of them think we are too violent and aggressive with them!

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There have been episodes where they have been made to look foolish but they take it on board. Deal with everyone politely, or as politely as you can and it works. Start off with aggression and you will almost always be met with the same. I was always for an easy life, not rolling around on the ground in pitched battle that need not have happened.

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There have been episodes where they have been made to look foolish but they take it on board. Deal with everyone politely, or as politely as you can and it works. Start off with aggression and you will almost always be met with the same. I was always for an easy life, not rolling around on the ground in pitched battle that need not have happened.

For me I am so worried about being painted as a gung-ho violent thug and being vilified that I like to ensure I am very much in the clear before I use any serious force.-I am more afraid of being hung out to dry than I am being assaulted!

I don't expect anyone else to do this but I generally remain "tranquil" and don't try to prevent the first punch or kick thrown at me. Once I've been hit and CCTV and even the most hostile of witnesses can't be in doubt about who started the violence I am much more confident to use force to subdue an offender.

There is a big difference between the IPCC looking at the predictable allegation that you used too much force to subdue someone who unquestionably attacked you first, and an allegation you used force on them for no reason.

Keeping my job and career is much more important to me than a bloody nose or split lip! -It's an awful thing to admit to but the fear of losing everything far exceeds my fear of a violent drunk!

HMS

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HMService, I got a split lip about twenty five /thirty years ago whilst trying to break up a fight, I just got in the way of his swing at the other guy (I think),he said he was sorry so I didn't mind too much,but told him to be a bit more carefull next time, although I don't get paid i also try to be very circumspect when in these situations but in my case it was to avoid as much paperwork as possible so I could get home at three after a hard days work.

As Blkerider above says,if you start low key and in a calm understanding manner then more often than not they will be more willing to do the same.

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HMService, I got a split lip about twenty five /thirty years ago whilst trying to break up a fight, I just got in the way of his swing at the other guy (I think),he said he was sorry so I didn't mind too much,but told him to be a bit more carefull next time, although I don't get paid i also try to be very circumspect when in these situations but in my case it was to avoid as much paperwork as possible so I could get home at three after a hard days work.

As Blkerider above says,if you start low key and in a calm understanding manner then more often than not they will be more willing to do the same.

That sounds like you think I go into every situation looking for a fight!The vast majority of aggressive situations I find myself in are resolved peacefully. To clarify I am talking about those situations whereby negotiation is not possible and things are already actively violent on arrival. While talking in a calm understanding manner in a low key is a great idea when confronted anyone, when it's with a heaving sweating violent criminal with pupils like saucers, who is audibly grinding his teeth and insisting that you and the other "Police Androids" wont be dissecting his brain...I find it less effective.

When negotiating with the sneering coke fuelled drunk telling you he's more than happy to go back to jail for breaking your face in front of an amused audience, again..it's less effective.

I get this a lot for some reason-Seasoned PCs on the internet espousing the virtues of good communication skills in the face of aggressive people as an alternative to all the unnecessary violence I start!-Much as if I was "that PC" who always got assaulted and was always calling for assistance! I guess I must come across as a gung ho thug! I shall be more careful in how I write that which I write!

Not the case I assure you.

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HMService,I am sorry if I gave you the impression that I was giving you advice on how to deal with troublemakers, that wasn't my intention at all,when I wrote "if you start low key" etc, I did not mean "you" personaly but we as police officers,all of us,and in particular any new recruits who happened to be just starting out reading the thread,clearly how we deal with a particular person is dependant on his or her demeanour on the first encounter,or if this particular man or woman is "known" then the plan to deal is adjusted accordingly,i know you know that,and have probably been telling people that for years,I am pleased that this is one of the first things taught to new recruits at use of force training, or officer safety training as it is now known,(it must sound better to the public) but after having read a lot of your posts either here or in another place I know perfectly well that you are not gung-ho, quite the reverse I would have thought,having been and still am operational for twice as long as I haven't, I know good advice when I read it, yours invariably comes into that category, incidently, when I think about it I recall the time just before we got CS gas, going to a domestic when we encountered just such a person as you describe ,he was like one of those wrestlers on the tele in the seventies,(like Billy Two Rivers)I don't think he was drugged I dont really know but he certainly had taken more drink than was good for him,once my reg partner and myself finally got him downstairs it took four us to hold him down on the ground till the van arrived,and we were all six foot or over,(and fit)we were all gasping for breath when we finaly got him in the van at the finish,it was rocking back and forth as though we had just captured a Gorrilla.i wish those leg straps things had been about at the time,the person who thought of them should have been bought a cake,Ha.

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Her in southern Africa we also get Police interceptors (on the BBC Knowledge channel). My own experience tells me that a good bit of editing goes on but what I really like is the way the coppers are shown as human - usually very philosophical about the realities they meet with the occasional barbed comment. In fact, to me, these guys & girls represent what is best about British Police Officers - down-to-earth lads & lassies with a considerable amount of realism and a good deal of compassion, humour and respect for the dignity of the folk they deal with. I never thought of them as "tranquil" but it isn't a bad word to sum up their overall approach to what they do and how they do it. 

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