Backlash

End of the road for police pursuits?

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The question that should be asked is what would the public expect of the officer? and I think it would be the same as the jury's verdict.

As usual where a police officer/CPS are concerned public interest and chances of a successful prosecution go out the window.

Whoever made the decision to prosecute should be embarrassed and ashamed- but I'm sure they won't be either of those.

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Below is an extract of the report-

By failing to terminate at the point where the force head of driving standards had retrospectively decided that the risk had become disproportionate, PC Holden had in effect ‘caused’ the subject vehicle to drive in a dangerous manner and was responsible for the danger that resulted. Again, in the words of the prosecutor: “He [the subject driver] is a dangerous driver. He will exhibit risk. The contention is PC Holden continued when it was disproportionate and exposed other road users to risk.”

The report will put the snippett into context but, as I understand it, this is the prosecutions argument. What an utter load of bullsh1t. The only one who caused the subject to drive dangerously is the fvcking driver of the subject car. Presumably he had control of the steering and brakes and could have activated them at any time the officer was behind him. What is the world coming to FFS. It really does make you wonder whether attending to an emergency is going to be worth it if this is the hassle you get for doing what you've been trained to and what the public would expect you to do- what next neglect of duty for obeying ALL road traffic signs on route to the serious RTA or suspects on call?

:angry: :angry: :angry: :angry:

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If this case had gone the other way, ie Police had been following the driver and had been deemed to have 'caused' the feeing vehicle to be driven dangerously I could see the following happening, every fleeing driver would continue to up the ante making every pursuit more dangerous than the last,

This would then result in a total no pursuit policy, or a compo school of thought, we would have people running straight from the scene into a car and driving off at 5mph because they know we can't follow

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Nothing is ever their fault is it?

FFS.

Don't even get me started about bikes..........(as in motorcycles).........

Why not? Don't you like them or is it the rule that it is too dangerous to chase a biker without a helmet?

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Maybe before the slagging off of CPS we should look at the actions of the Force itself, after the incident itr was reviewed by another force who prasied PC Holdens driving throughout, it was a review by some arsewipe in his own force that came to a different conclusion and decided after the event and not been present they would try and make a name for themsleves, this is becoming all to common in the job not just in pursuit driving, no damage to vehicles, no injuries to anyone, no complaints why then did this cock conclude a prosecution was in order, we have to many spineless incompetent halfwits in this job just looking to pass judgement on colleagues, most are to s** scared to go out and do the job,

the fact that CPS ran with the prosecution should surprise no one really, they get some perverted sexual kick out of it, charge a serial offender and do what expected well that wont get them in the papers

Hampshire SMT need to take a long hard look at how they treat their staff, and the public need to be made aware that police wont come to your assistance because if they do something their office dwelling managers dont like they will charged and sent to court

more sense from the jury than from Hampshire police and CPS

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This may not go down well and in no way relates to this case but, when viewing some of the cases on Police Interceptors etc through a MOP's eyes (although I have done a civilian driving course with Essex Police many years ago, when they had a skid pan in Springfield) I do think sometimes "just let him go, it just isn't worth it". Wrong side of the road, oncoming traffic, clipping passing wing mirrors, but they continue the pursuit. I appreciate it's an exceedingly difficult call, however I do watch sometimes and think "that's enough".

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I think a balanced viewpoint in all cases is what is needed. Unfortunately you will never get a balanced viewpoint until the retrospective brigade come in and view the videos. Even then the 'balanced viewpoint' often comes from someone who has no pursuit experience and even no road policing experience.

I have, over the years, toned down what I think as being 'acceptable', due to the more and more apparence of lack of support. I have also terminated pursuits when I feel that something terrible is likely to result and I do not want to be a part of it. The danger is the 'red mist' syndrome, where the pursuit driver has to catch the bad guy, no matter what. A modern pursuit driver has to have to have two simultaneous trains of thought these days.... 1 - What would I like to happen ? and 2 - What would the bosses do if they viewed this video ? It's sad for the pursuit driver, but as with anything else in society, there has to be someone to blame when something goes wrong and invariably it is the Police who gets the flack. No boss is going to accept any flack, when he can fairly and squarely direct it at the pursuit driver.

ergo......look after number 1.

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You can be ordered to disgengage from a pursuit. You can't be ordered to continue a pursuit. It's your call and down to your "dynamic risk assessment". I would suggest that you do what bosses routinely do and be risk averse.

You really do have to ask yourself "is it worth it?". Invariably the answer is going to be 'no'.

So there you have it. The public get the policing that they deserve........we get no backing from anybody. Castigated in the press whatever decision we make. So, when asked why you decided to stop the pursuit, I'd suggest something along the lines of "In my opinion, it was not safe to continue the pursuit, so I stopped."

There is going to be nobody there but you, and maybe a crewmate. So who's to say what is safe and what is not?

What a f*cking sorry state of affairs to be in. I'm TPAC trained and an advanced driver - what was the point of training me to do that when the subject I'm following's driving is my fault because he won't stop when I make a lawful request to do so. And when failing to stop is an actual offence.

Bloody bonkers.

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I once upset a promotion board when they posed this question. It was at a time when the Federation had asked ACPO and the Home office for guidance on pursuits. As no reply had been forthcoming I thought that it was an unfair promotion board question, even though I was a Grade 1 Advanced Driver.. My answer included "That it would be better for the offending driver to die than for an innocent motorist or pedestrain". It also incluidded that both ACPO and the Home Office had failed to respond to the same querstion.

As the truth hurts, I remained in the same rank.

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The solution seems elementary, just stop pursuing suspect vehicles.

When questions are asked about this I am sure most officers will be able to provide a credible answer based on the facts of the case under discussion and other safety considerations.

To be honest, if still serving I would be unwilling to engage in vehicle pursuits any more, nor would i exceed speed limits and red traffic signals en route to calls, other than those involving colleagues requiring assistance. I know Police Officers have certain exemptions under current Road Traffic Law respecting speed limits etc. but nobody can force an officer to drive at a speed other than that which he deems safe.

Been there, done that one and won the day.

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