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PoliceUK

Sun Spotlights Police Pensioners

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This self-styled Taxpayers Alliance are beginning to get on my nerves.

Retired police officers have earned the right to draw their pension. They've actually made a contribution to their pension, unlike members of parliament and other public sector fat-cats.

Retired police officers who draw their pension and continue to work also pay Income Tax and other contributions. Thereby putting some more money back into the system.

The fact that some private sector workers don't have the foresight, intelligence or inclination to take out a private pension scheme is no reason to criticise those who are lucky enough to have access to this scheme.

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And the point is..... what?

An officer pays 11% of their salary for 30 years and then gets a pension.

A vacancy arises in the police for a non-officer job.

Someone gets that job.

Cost to the tax payers = 1 x Police Pension + 1 x Salary

What difference does it make if the same person gets the pension and the salary or one gets the pension and another the salary? The cost is just the same.

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11% contribution sounds a lot.  Here in New South Wales Police, of which I was a member for 35 years, we contributed 6% of our salary into the Police Superannuation Fund.  Upon retirement I got a fortnightly lifetime police pension equal to 72.75% of final salary, which is indexed to Consumer Price Index ( CPI - annual inflation rate.)  Our CPI  here is around 3% a year.  On a police pensioner's death the spouse gets around half pay pension.   

 

However a police pensioner here would not receive any old age pension from the Government as there is no automatic right here for the OAP, incomes are means tested for the OAP, so I will get nothing from there, when I hit OAP age of 65 (I am 62 now.) 

 

As for pollies getting easy pensions, not wrong, a pollie here does 7 years in State/Federal Parliament and walks out with $75,000 a year pension, much the same as a  Police Inspector would get, say after 35 years service, all wrong.Ouch

 

No income tax is payable on a police pension, once you attain 60 years of age.   I believe in UK you can get out on half pay pension after 20 years, cannot do that here, minmum of 30 years service and be 55 years of age or older.  Just thought ours may be  something to compare with yours.

 

Go for the max lads, you earned it, you deserve it !Clap

 

As for retired police officers on pensions getting remployed as civvies, nothing wrong with that, happen here now and then, not for me though I spend mine on golf balls and cruiseships !

 

 
NSWP2010-09-11 04:38:05

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And the point is..... what?An officer pays 11% of their salary for 30 years and then gets a pension. A vacancy arises in the police for a non-officer job. Someone gets that job.Cost to the tax payers = 1 x Police Pension + 1 x SalaryWhat difference does it make if the same person gets the pension and the salary or one gets the pension and another the salary? The cost is just the same.

smiley32.gif

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Tried responding to the original article but it got lost as I hadn't signed in.

The article is correct in so far as anybody with a private pension draws it at the appointed time without reference to the individual's employment status. All pension contributions have however been paid by the individual, his employer will not have contributed.

Private sector company pensions are different, and we paid contributions just as you do. My pension would be suspended if I worked for any company within the group. I could however go and work for a competitor and continue to draw my pension.

Despite the apparent absurdity I can see some logic behind the ruling. My company also contributed to my pension, as the taxpayer does to all public service pensions. Also, the company has to continue contributing to my pension after I have retired and am drawing my pension, again as the taxpayer does for all public service pensions. There is therefore some logic in the company saying they will not pay a pension at the same time as they are paying that individual a salary. Why should the public sector be different? Note: The pension would increase whilst suspended either by RPI, if already at the statutory limit, or by the more generous scheme rules if below the statutory limit.

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People talk about our pensions as though we don't pay for them...I am incredulous.

Sorry to be a pain in the rear, but in reality you don't. A Police pension costs around 36-37% of pensionable pay. You pay 11%. Yes it is a contribution towards a pension but in reality it only covers a small percentage of the total (my maths is dodgy, but around 30%?). The public purse picks up the other 70%.

I have absolutely no issue with this, it's what you signed up for, particularly as my Grandfather managed to draw 49 years (50-99 years of age).

I do have an issue when Officers say they pay for their pension. The facts are they pay a partial contribution.

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And the point is..... what? An officer pays 11% of their salary for 30 years and then gets a pension. A vacancy arises in the police for a non-officer job. Someone gets that job. Cost to the tax payers = 1 x Police Pension + 1 x Salary What difference does it make if the same person gets the pension and the salary or one gets the pension and another the salary? The cost is just the same.

I think the point being, why not keep the Police Officer employed to do the job, rather than retire them and then re-employ them? I suppose what grates with the public is it is often said by officers that after 30 to 35 years of working they are unable to continue the role, however on this evidence they can continue to offer a valuable service to the Police. Perhaps if the Police were asked to work, say 40 years with the last 5-10 years covering some of the roles in this article then the pension contributions etc would be more realistic to what is received upon retirement.

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