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Found 121 results

  1. The 11-year-old police-mad boy managed to raise £150,000 for Brain Tumour Research before he died. The force surprised the family of Finlay Church at his old school with the pooch A new West Midlands Police dog has been named in memory of a boy who dreamed of becoming a police officer. German Shepherd Finn is named after 11-year-old Finlay Church who managed to raise over £150,000 for Brain Tumour Research and Birmingham Children’s Hospital before he died from brain cancer in November 2015. The boy, who had a passion for policing, organised a series of fundraisers after his diagnosis including achieving a world record for the longest line of teddies. After making an “unforgettable” impression on staff when he achieved a long held ambition to spend a couple of days with the force, they decided to name one of their latest crime fighting hounds in his honour. Police staff surprised Finlay’s family by arriving at his old Alvechurch Middle School with the 12-week-old pup last Friday while they were organising a fundraising Wear A Hat Day in aid of brain tumour research. Finlay’s mum Penny said: "This is the most wonderful gesture to have a police dog named in honour of Fin. "West Midlands Police has always been incredibly supportive of us and our fundraising work and to keep Fin’s legacy alive in this way is very humbling. “He loved dogs and desperately wanted to be an armed response officer so this really is a fitting tribute. “We can’t thank the Dogs Unit enough for enabling police dog Finn to live out Fin’s aspirations." Family, friends and the force have carried on raising money for Brain Tumour Research and last year West Midlands Police hats helped to set an unusual record relating to headwear placed in a row as part of their efforts. Sergeant Phil McMullen, who took part in some of the charity events, said: "Finlay was an aspiring police officer and we were all deeply saddened when he passed away. "He wanted to help others which is one of the greatest qualities a PC can have "We had discussed the idea of naming a police dog after Finlay and this seemed a nice time to surprise his family. "Finn the dog struck up an instant bond with them and we hope he will soon be out on the beat to help the public - just like his namesake." Read on Police Oracle
  2. Police have hit back at a national newspaper after it pictured a group of officers having a cup of tea at a Devon seaside cafe. This morning the Sun newspaper ran a story which stated that eight uniformed police officers stopped for a 45 minute break while on shift for a cuppa and a bacon sarnie at a cafe on the promenade at Plymouth Hoe http://www.devonlive.com/police-shame-the-sun-as-officers-pictured-drinking-tea-at-seaside-cafe-in-devon/story-30271556-detail/story.html
  3. British Transport police say incident at Livingston North station near Edinburgh could have derailed a train https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/apr/14/police-hunt-youths-ladder-railway-tracks-livingston-north-edinburgh
  4. Over 1,300 police officers are suing the PSNI chief constable George Hamilton for holiday pay. http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/1300-police-officers-to-sue-psni-chief-hamilton-for-holiday-pay-35622714.html
  5. In response to the stats, the Home Office claims its reforms are working. Britain's largest police force has recorded a surge in violent, gun and knife crime in what officers warned is a national phenomenon. Scotland Yard registered annual rises across a number of serious offence categories in the last 12 months, following several years of falls. There were jumps in robbery, theft, violence, gun and knife crime in 2016/17 in London and police say the pattern is being replicated around the country. The disclosures will reignite the debate over resources following warnings from a string of senior figures over the impacts of further budget squeezes on forces. They also come weeks after watchdogs issued a stark warning over the "potentially perilous" state of British policing, and lay bare the challenges facing new Scotland Yard chief Cressida Dick. Statistics published by the Metropolitan Police show that: Gun crime increased by more than two fifths (42%) year-on-year with 2,544 offences recorded in 2016/17 Knife crime jumped by almost a quarter (24%), with more than 4,000 offences involving blades resulting in an injury The total number of offences recorded by the force rose by nearly 4.6% from 740,933 to 774,737 Violence against the person crimes were up by 4.7% while there were also increases in robberies (12%), sex offences (9%) and theft (7%) There were 110 homicides - one more than the previous year Sanction detection rates - the proportion of cases where action is taken against a suspect such as a charge or caution - were down across a number of categories As the figures were released, officers raised the alarm over a shift in knife crime which has seen the proportion of youngsters carrying blades who are affiliated with gangs fall from around a third to approximately a quarter. Officers reported an increasing trend for youths in the capital to keep blades on them for protection rather than in order to carry out crime. Assistant Commissioner Martin Hewitt said: "Young people carrying knives are doing so for a variety of reasons including status, criminality and self-protection but only around a quarter are affiliated with gangs. "There is a phenomenon of people feeling that you need to carry a knife to be safe. There is a lot greater sense that 'I need this to protect myself'. The problem comes when you then get a confrontation." The Met has launched investigations into three separate fatal stabbings in the capital since the start of the week. On the overall crime figures, Mr Hewitt insisted that London is "one of the safest global cities in the world". He said: "Similar to the rest of England and Wales, crime rates in London are rising, but many of these are still at a much lower level than five years ago and are against the backdrop of significant reductions in resources." The force has closed dozens of police stations and lost hundreds of staff as it made savings totalling hundreds of millions of pounds since 2010, although officer numbers have remained broadly steady at around 31,000. Deputy London Mayor for Policing Sophie Linden, said: "These figures are deeply disturbing, and a stark reminder of the enormous pressure our police are under every day as they work so tirelessly to protect us." In response to the worrying figures the Home Office highlighted improvements in violent crime rates elsewhere but acknowledged more had to be done. A spokeswoman said: "Police reform is working, with the latest ONS figures showing crimes traditionally measured by the (British Crime) Survey have fallen by a third since 2010 to a record low, with over 370,000 fewer violent crimes a year. "Every violent crime is a significant concern and this Government is taking action to tackle it and keep our communities safe, including through actions set out in our Modern Crime Prevention Strategy. "Last year, we banned zombie knives, extended our work with retailers to prevent underage sales of knives and supported police in a week of action where they seized more than 1,200 weapons and made 300 arrests. "We know there is more to be done. We will continue to work with the police, retailers and voluntary groups to tackle knife crime and ensure support is available for victims of gang violence and exploitation." View on Police Oracle
  6. A mental health practitioner will accompany police officers to incidents involving mental health issues under the scheme. A previously successful trial where nurses pair with officers responding to calls involving mental issues is returning to Kent. The pilot by Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust (KMPT) and Kent Police will run in Thanet over the next few months when demand for attendance at mental health related incidents is high. Kent Police detained 1,256 people under section 136 of the Mental Health Act in 2016 and chief superintendent Rachel Curtis hopes the triage team will help officers make “informed decisions”. She said: “The street triage scheme will mean a qualified medical professional attending mental health related incidents in Thanet that have been reported to the police. “Our police officers receive mental health training the same way they receive first aid training but they are not medical experts. “The pilot will mean those in crisis will receive qualified medical help and the officers will have on-the-scene advice from an expert to make informed decisions. “The number one priority here is making sure those suffering a mental health crisis get the most appropriate care and treatment.” The street triage scheme is the latest in a number measures KMPT and Kent Police have put in place to address mental health in police incidents in the county. KMPT’s Director of Transformation, Vincent Badu, said: “We are delighted to be involved in the delivery of this pilot scheme, which will offer a local response to anyone in crisis. “The scheme demonstrates the importance of partnership working and, through the Concordat, we have agreed joint outcomes and measures which will enable us to capture all the improvements achieved.” Kent Police and Crime Commissioner Matthew Scott says he will be “keeping a close eye” on the progress of the initiative. He said: “Cases involving mental health now amount for around a third of Kent Police time. “I am pleased to see the return of a street triage scheme. “I will be keeping a close eye on the scheme to see whether it helps deliver against the priorities set out within my Safer in Kent Plan. “I also continue to welcome bids to my Mental Health and Policing Fund from projects which free up police officers’ time while also ensuring that people in mental health crisis get the right support from the right person. “The increased time police spend dealing with mental health is unsustainable nationally so I will be discussing the triage outcomes with my fellow PCCs and Government so that other force areas can decide whether they wish to replicate this scheme in their own communities.” View on Police Oracle
  7. Chairman of the Scottish Police Federation described the payments a "significant issue" for members The Scottish Police Federation is challenging Police Scotland over special payments to armed officers who protect the royal family on holiday. Police Scotland stopped enhanced payments to officers for the previous two summers for protecting Her Majesty The Queen and the Royals while they holidayed in the Highlands. In the past the force made the payments due to officers being far away from friends and family and remained “on call”. However, the “held in reserve” payments have been ditched as Police Scotland attempts to close a £190 million funding gap by 2021, according to the Sunday Post. The situation has resulted in an officer, backed by the fed, initiating a judicial review of the decision at the highest civil court in Scotland, the Court of Session. The officer bringing the case is one of many who provide protection for the Royals costing an estimated £100 million per year. Prior to the unification of Scottish forces providing protection for the Royals was the responsibility of the eight regional forces dependent on where the Windsors were. This meant officers were able to return home after being on duty and, as such, did not qualify for the payments. Police Scotland argue the officers based at Balmoral do not qualify for the payments despite them being enshrined in rules by the Police Negotiating Board. A decision on the matter is expected in the next few weeks and general secretary of the Scottish Police Federation Calum Steele says they had “little option” but to pursue the matter legally. He said: “This is a significant issue for our officers. “The force has changed its approach to the reimbursement of officers and we are challenging it. “We have tried to resolve this long before the Court of Sessions action but feel little option but to go down the legal route.” A spokesman for Police Scotland said: “We will not comment on this as it involves an active legal case.” View on Police Oracle
  8. NPCC Chairman, writing exclusively for Police Oracle, says balance between full investigation and fair treatment of armed police officers must be found. Police officers who serve as part of firearms units are volunteering themselves for an immensely difficult and dangerous role that will put them in harm’s way. While the rest of us take cover, armed officers rush into the face of danger. They deserve more than just our thanks and respect. To do their job, armed officers need our active support. At Chief Constables Council which I chaired last week, we discussed current draft statutory guidance submitted by the IPCC for handling incidents when a weapon is discharged causing death or serious harm, all ‘key policing witnesses’ – including officers themselves – should be separated from one another. While we understand that in some circumstances this might be required, this will frequently be unnecessary. DCC Simon Chesterman, our national firearms lead, has been working with the IPCC on these draft procedures. He has publicly raised our concerns about the draft guidance on our behalf. He does so with my full support and the total confidence of all chief constables. Post-incident procedures must strike a balance between robust investigation by independent bodies and fair treatment of officers involved. It is not necessary to always separate officers from their team during what is a traumatic experience. Under existing College of Policing guidance, the officers are under constant supervision by an appointed senior officer and their sole purpose is to prevent any conferring. The IPCC also has the right to be present and observe all the post-incident procedures to verify their integrity. The Court of Appeal has recognised this guidance as providing reasonable safeguards against collusion. I wrote to the Home Secretary about these concerns last year and cited a survey conducted by the Mayor of London’s Office for Policing and Crime in which 82 per cent of surveyed armed officers were not comfortable with these proposed changes. These changes could make it more difficult to recruit more volunteers to take up an armed role. In this uncertain climate and severe risk level we need more trained armed police officers to tackle the threats we face. We intend to keep working with the IPCC and Government to find the right balance and ensure that our processes reflect the support that our officers deserve. View on Police Oracle
  9. Thousands of officers pay respect to their fallen colleague. Tributes have been paid to PC Palmer across the United Kingdom Heroic PC Keith Palmer has been laid to rest following a full force funeral in central London. A black horse escort, fronted by the Met’s Mounted Branch led the procession along a ceremonial route through the capital from the Palace of Westminster to Southwark Cathedral. Thousands of officers lined the route, the National Police Air Service staged a helicopter flyover and a two minute silence was held at 2pm. Colleagues and friends of PC Palmer acted as pall bearers and conveyed his coffin into the cathedral once the procession had arrived. Officers and police forces across the country shared their tributes to PC Palmer earlier today. PC Barry Calder of the Royal Protection command posted photos of his formal dress, including shined boots, white gloves and service medals, on Twitter. "It's going to be a very emotional day but I'll be proud that I wear the same uniform as Keith did," he wrote. PC Calder, who has served with the Metropolitan Police for 25 years, told Press Association he arrived at Westminster just ten minutes after the attack on March 23. As he gathered with other officers on the streets of south London, he said: "I've never seen so many police officers in smart dress as there are here today". PC Steve Richardson, a senior section officer with West Yorkshire Police, travelled down from Leeds to attend the service with 35 other officers. He shared photos of his preparations and pictures of himself with PC Molly Carnall when they arrived in London. "It's a sense of pride to support your colleagues at this sad time," PC Richardson told Press Association. "It's quite difficult stuck up north when this happens in London. You feel powerless and want to help but you can't, so coming down means a lot. "The thin blue line may be slightly thinner, but it certainly can't be broken." Police forces around the country also shared their tributes. In Gloucester, the city community policing team published an image of an officer lighting a candle at Gloucester Cathedral in memory of PC Palmer. "Taking a moment to remember" while out on patrol, the accompanying text read. The Horncastle Neighbourhood Policing Team posted a picture of a rose left outside Horncastle police station with a hand-written note saying "In memory of PC Palmer". "A fitting tribute at Horncastle Station for #PCKeithPalmerRIP #StandForKeith by a member of the local community," wrote a member of the team to accompany the photo. The official account for the Cheshire Special Constabulary published an image of scores of officers in formal attire lining Southwark Bridge Road, a few blocks from Southwark Cathedral, where the funeral took place. "Standing Ready to #StandForKeith," read the tribute. View on Police Oracle
  10. Thousands of police officers are expected to assemble in London for the funeral of the PC murdered in the Westminster terror attack. http://www.standard.co.uk/news/london/pc-keith-palmer-funeral-5000-police-officers-set-to-line-streets-to-remember-heroic-westminster-a3510976.html Anyone from PoliceUK going to London tomorrow? I understand officers across the U.K. are being asked to partake in a two minutes silence, at 2pm, at the front of their police stations (where possible).
  11. Tool has been removed for officers in England and Wales. The Home Office is considering bringing back a pensions calculator to demonstrate to officers in England and Wales the outcomes of paying in. Earlier this week PoliceOracle.com reported the Scottish Public Pensions Agency is to launch such a tool following the revelation that ten per cent of officers in the country are not part of the scheme. Scottish Police Federation chairman Andrea MacDonald revealed the statistic regarding the 1,600 officers not paying in for a pension. She said UK Government changes in 2015 had put people off, but encouraged them to sign up for “the best investment you will ever make”. A spokesman for the Police Federation of England and Wales told PoliceOracle.com yesterday: “We are aware a calculator is going to be available for officers in Scotland. We are actively encouraging the Home Office to look at providing a pensions calculator for use by officers in England and Wales.” Figures for the current scheme take-up in England and Wales are harder to obtain as they are held by each of the individual forces. The Home Office, which previously had such a tool on its website, says it is weighing up whether to do so again. A Home Office spokesman said: “This government is committed to ensuring that public service pensions are affordable, sustainable and fair. “We are considering the merits of and options for a benefits calculator for police pension scheme members in England and Wales, but no decisions have been taken at this stage.” He added the government is working with the England and Wales Scheme Advisory board on the issue. A Police Federation for Northern Ireland spokesman said the staff association is not aware that the PSNI has experienced a similar drop-off in those taking up pensions since 2015. View on Police Oracle
  12. Police officers have started using a car-sharing club which could cut costs and the size of its own fleet, The Scotsman has learned. http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/police-start-using-car-sharing-club-vehicles-to-cut-costs-1-4409251 Interesting move, hopefully it works out cheaper!
  13. The number of ambulances called out to police custody suites in London more than doubled, from 2,374 to 5,018, in the past four years, a rise that critics say exposes the shortage of nurses to assess and treat detainees. https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/apr/01/met-police-shortage-nurses-ambulance-call-outs
  14. Scottish pensions authority is introducing a calculator to help demonstrate benefits. Nearly ten per cent of police officers in Scotland are no longer paying into the force’s pension scheme, in a move which has been blamed on recent negative changes to the package. Similar negative alterations were made to more than 14,000 young in service officers’ pensions across the whole of the UK at the same time. As a result of the drop in numbers, authorities in Scotland are creating a new pensions calculator in the hope it will encourage people to continue to pay in. Andrea MacDonald, chairman of the Scottish Police Federation, revealed the statistic at the staff association’s annual conference. She said: “Like others, our pensions were dramatically changed in 2015 when the UK Government changed the law so that police officers would work longer and pay more for their pension. “We warned at the time that if the cut was too deep, our members would vote with their feet and either leave the pension scheme, or not join it when they were recruited. “In only a couple of years we have moved from a situation where virtually everyone was in the pension scheme to one where hundreds of officers are not.” Mrs MacDonald added that there are now around 1,600 officers who are not in the pension scheme, and that she believes this is because of the expense incurred and a lack of information about the benefits of signing up. She said: “I worry about these young officers and their families. Pensions are not just about retirement on completion of service. The schemes cover ill-health, injury, death in service, spouse and dependant cover. “Doing our job without this cover seems far too much of a risk to me and I urge every officer not in the pension scheme to think again. “The in-service protections and the significant employer's contribution plus financial security for you and your dependants, mean the police pension is the best investment you will ever make. "I know recruits can often be under financial pressure but my advice to them is that whatever they do, join the pension scheme and stay in it.” Responding to her at the conference, Scottish Justice Secretary Michael Matheson said that he agrees that the pensions are still hugely important. He added: “I urge the service and staff associations to continue highlighting the benefits to every officer. “To help officers understand what the new scheme will mean in the future the Scottish Public Pensions Agency has commissioned the scheme actuary to produce a specialised pensions calculator, this has been developed to give individuals a clear idea of the value of the scheme and has been produced in consultation with the police pension board which has senior SPF representation on it.” This will be available to officers by the summer, he said. A pension reform calculator produced by the Home Office in 2015 has been marked as “withdrawn” on the UK Government website. Figures for how many officers have left pension schemes in England, Wales and Northern Ireland were not available before this article went live. Thousands of officers are taking legal action to challenge the imposition of the CARE scheme and the manner in which it was imposed, but it is not backed by staff associations. View on Police Oracle
  15. A planned 3,000-person drinking trip on inflatable dinghies on a city centre river has been criticised by police. The River Tyne Booze Cruise is based on the Finnish Kaljakellunta, meaning "beer floating". This is "what England needs", organisers said. They said alcohol quantities would be "regulated". Northumbria Police said they were concerned about people drinking a "significant amount of alcohol" in vessels that were not "appropriate". "The River Tyne is not a countryside stream," a spokesman said. "The current is strong, there is a lot of debris and a number of vessels use the waterway every single day. "A rubber dinghy is not an appropriate vessel to be used on this river and if people were to fall overboard then they could find themselves in real danger." The force said it would speak to the organisers. One, Kieran Chapman, said it was "more of a social drink not a night out in town getting mortal". "People will be searched before they go on to the river to make sure that they're not drinking five litres of vodka," he said. The event's Facebook page recommends participants wear armbands and life jackets and stay on their vessel at all times "to eliminate accidents". The July event, lasting three-and-a-half hours, is due to begin in Newburn and finish on the quayside. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-tyne-39418982
  16. A national campaign, led by the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry, has released a film featuring celebrities talking about how they faced their own mental health problems. Rapper Professor Green, cricketer Freddie Flintoff, comedian Ruby Wax and others say admitting their problems for the first time made them realise they were not alone. But for many, asking for help can be much harder. "We didn't really know what we were being sent to," Dan Farnworth, a paramedic in the north-west, says. "The next thing I knew, a child was just placed into my arms." It was 2015, and Dan had just been sent to a 999 call that would change his life. "When we arrived we knocked on the front door, but we couldn't get in. We didn't know what had happened inside," the 31-year-old told the Victoria Derbyshire programme. It quickly became apparent the call involved the murder of a young child. "All of a sudden this little girl was just placed in my arms," Dan, a father-of-four, says. "I just remember looking at her. I remember thinking she looked like one of my own children. She had the same colour hair as one of my children. "I just felt like I froze. It was scary. It is the worst thing I have ever seen in 12 years of doing this job." Flashbacks That night, the horror of what Dan had witnessed began to dawn on him. He finished his shift early and went home, but couldn't sleep. He soon realised something more serious was wrong. "I started having nightmares and flashbacks," he says. "My mind started filling in the gaps, seeing things happen that I hadn't actually seen. "It was awful. I had flashbacks during the day and I was becoming like a recluse and not talking to people at work." In the days and weeks that followed, Dan says he became "a different person". "I realised something was wrong but didn't know where to turn. It was like I was in a deep dark hole, I was scared and drinking and smoking more heavily." Dan says he was struggling to deal with his mental health problems, but feared being honest with his employers might have seen him lose his job. He had always wanted to work in the emergency services. Starting in the ambulance control room answering 999 calls, he then spent time dispatching the air ambulance, before finally applying for a job as an emergency medical technician. He had been on the road since 2010. "I was actually scared that by opening up and talking about what was going on, someone would turn round and say 'this job isn't for you'." 'Put the kettle on' Eventually Dan reached out to his friend and fellow paramedic Rich Morton. Dan says he typed out a text message, telling Rich what had been going on. However, he deleted it before he could send it. He re-wrote the message, but again deleted it. He wrote the message for a third time, and this time pressed send. Dan was so scared of what his friend would say that he hid his mobile phone under a pillow. "He texted me straight back, saying 'put the kettle on, I'm coming over'," he says now. "That text message was the first day of the rest of my life." Dan was later diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). He was signed off work for five months. He says he was offered "unbelievable" support from his GP and received counselling. According to the charity Mind, he is not alone in working in the emergency services and suffering mental health problems. The charity says nearly 90% of blue light staff have reported stress and poor mental health at work. Emergency workers are twice as likely to identify problems at work as the main cause of those mental health problems as the general workforce, Mind says. Dan and Rich have since started their own charity, called Our Blue Light, aimed at improving the mental health of blue light services workers. And through their involvement with Mind, Dan and Rich have also rubbed shoulders with the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry. Marathon challenge Last year, the three royals launched a new campaign called Heads Together, aimed at ending the stigma surrounding mental health. On Wednesday, Heads Together released a series of films to encourage "a national conversation" about mental health. Celebrities including cricketer Freddie Flintoff, comedian Ruby Wax and ex-Downing Street communications director Alastair Campbell have released films about their mental health struggles. In a statement, the royals said: "We have seen time and time again that shattering stigma on mental health starts with simple conversations. "When you realise that mental health problems affect your friends, neighbours, children and spouses, the walls of judgement and prejudice around these issues begin to fall." The royals say attitudes towards mental health are now "at tipping point." As for Dan, Prince Harry had a more specific challenge. "He told me we should run the London Marathon," Dan says, "so we started running the very next day." "Stigmas still exist and [mental health] is a taboo subject," Dan says. "People think mental health is a big issue, but I'm Dan, I'm 31 years old with a job and a family and my life is normal. But I have a mental health problem." Watch the Victoria Derbyshire programme on weekdays between 09:00 and 11:00 on BBC Two and the BBC News Channel. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-39432297
  17. An attempted murder inquiry has been launched after a driver reversed, dragging a police officer down the street. The incident happened in the Sighthill area of Glasgow at about 13:00 on Tuesday. The officer had been speaking to the driver of a red Vauxhall Astra when he suddenly threw the car into reverse. He then got out of his car in Alford Street and fled on foot. The police officer was unhurt. A Police Scotland spokesman said: "The officer did not require medical treatment and resumed duty following the incident. The man in the car then ran off. "Police are following a positive line of inquiry." The Scottish Police Federation has been made aware of the incident. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-39433018 Sounds bad, but I understand the police officer was left shaken but unhurt.
  18. This year is the fourth installment of the US inspired fundraiser. Applications are open for the fifth annual Policy Unity Tour bike ride in memory of fallen officers. The tour leaves the National Police Memorial in The Mall and makes the 180 mile journey to the National Arboretum in Staffordshire over a three day event. There are also nine other rides which start out at various locations across the country. Police officers of all ranks, police staff and family members of fallen officers all take part and each rider cycles in memory of a police officer killed in the line of duty. The event was inspired by the Police Unity Tour in the United States which has been running since 1997 and runs from New Jersey to Washington DC. Each rider is given an engraved bracelet depicting the officer they are riding for, which they then present to the family of the officer upon completion of the ride. President of Police Unity UK Tour, Rob Atkin MBE, said: “This is a truly humbling experience and one that our colleague’s families truly appreciate. “The memorial service at the National Arboretum is a truly moving event with all of the 43 UK Police Forces represented and offers a chance for our riders to show their respects and meet with the families to show that their loved one will never be forgotten. “This is a great way to ride in memory of fallen officers and raise money for the charity UK COPS. We would like this year to be our biggest ride ever and really show as a policing family our response to tragedies which involve officers losing their lives.” This year’s event leaves various locations across the country on Friday July 28. More information, including how to get involved, can be found here. View on Police Oracle
  19. ACC Berry spoke to PoliceOracle.com prior to latest debates over police access to communications data. The Investigatory Powers Act should be good enough for police forces to use to investigate serious digital crime, the officer who leads in the area believes. Assistant Chief Constable Richard Berry has recently taken over as full time chief officer lead on the digital investigations intelligence programme and communications data portfolio at the NPCC. Speaking to PoliceOracle.com early last week he was asked if the revised version of the Act had done away with the “gaps” which senior personnel had warned would prevent them accessing communications data not directly linked to criminality, when a draft version of the law was unveiled. ACC Berry said: “I think so. Like all things the challenge is for legislation to keep up with the technology and there are provisions within the Act to enable it to do so, so we hopefully we don’t end up in a RIPA situation where it’s kind of patched together just to try and keep pace with things. “For example the provisions around internet connection records and internet protocol address resolution which were key comms data aspects of the IP Act look like they’re going to be resilient but we’ve got a long way to go in terms of being able to deliver the technical capabilities, and it’s very much a dynamic process which reflects the nature of the digital environment. “If we’re not constantly evolving, whether it’s technical terms, legislative terms, operational terms or whatever perspective you want to look at it will become very challenging for us. “I think it will meet our requirements but it’s the need to constantly adapt and the legislation is no different in that.” While the Act has received royal assent, it has still not been implemented, and it faces a legal challenge started by Labour deputy leader Tom Watson and now-Brexit Minister David Davis. Plans for training practitioners to operate under the new legislative framework are being worked out, although are subject to change if the legal challenge alters the review of the law. The challenge has come about after the European Court of Justice (ECJ) found the "general and indiscriminate" retention of communications data was illegal. ACC Berry spoke to PoliceOracle.com following the International Communications Data & Digital Forensics Conference which took place in west London. On Sunday, Home Secretary Amber Rudd criticised the companies for creating encrypted messaging services. Media reports have claimed terrorist Khalid Masood accessed WhatsApp shortly before he carried out his attack in Westminster last week. Ms Rudd told BBC One's Andrew Marr Show: "It is completely unacceptable, there should be no place for terrorists to hide. "We need to make sure that organisations like WhatsApp, and there are plenty of others like that, don't provide a secret place for terrorists to communicate with each other. "It used to be that people would steam-open envelopes or just listen in on phones when they wanted to find out what people were doing, legally, through warrantry. "But on this situation we need to make sure that our intelligence services have the ability to get into situations like encrypted WhatsApp." WhatsApp said in response it had been assisting the police investigation. A spokeswoman said: "We are horrified at the attack carried out in London earlier this week and are co-operating with law enforcement as they continue their investigations." Critics of Ms Rudd’s comments have pointed out that encryption is needed to keep any personal data secure from hackers. Others say individuals can develop their own encrypted messaging services without having to rely on commercial apps, and would be more likely to do so if WhatsApp weakened its privacy settings. ACC Berry said the pace of change in technology is one of the biggest challenges facing digital investigators. View on Police Oracle
  20. Students at Cardiff University had their group chat interrupted by a police officer as he sent a selfie using Facebook Messenger http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/03/16/police-officer-goes-viral-sending-selfie-group-chat-helping/
  21. The original target of £250,000 for the family of heroic PC Palmer was smashed inside 24 hours. A fundraising page for the family of fallen police hero PC Keith Palmer has raised more than £500,000 in less than a day. The JustGiving page was set up by the Metropolitan Police Federation on Thursday and quickly received thousands of donations. Originally the target had been to collect £250,000 for the family of PC Keith Palmer, who was killed on Wednesday in a knife attack near Parliament, but within hours that target was smashed. On Friday afternoon, just 24 hours after the page was set up, it had reached £572,838 and counting from almost 27,000 donors. Chairman of the Met fed Ken Marsh described the ten of thousands pouring in as ‘overwhelming’ and was grateful for the public support. He said: “We set it up quickly on Thursday and we are overwhelmed with the generosity of the public and police family but we are not surprised because we have seen how everyone has come together to support the police (since the attack). “I think that is because we police by consent in this country and the public are aware of the danger we face. “Every day, all over London and the rest of the UK, Police Officers risk their lives to protect and defend us. In the wake of this tragedy our thoughts are with Keith’s family and all the people who are injured have lost their lives. “I would not think for one minute that money is the answer for the family of PC Palmer and what they are going through but hopefully it can help in some small way.” View on Police Oracle
  22. The website running a fundraising campaign to raise money for the family of murdered policeman Pc Keith Palmer is refusing to waive its five per cent fee, The Telegraph can disclose. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/03/24/justgiving-pockets-30000-fund-raise-money-family-pc-keith-palmer/ I'm in two minds about this - it is quite a lot of money (although they have donated £10,000 of their fee) However it presumably costs a lot of money to keep such a service up and running, especially at times of high demand, plus keep it secure too. On top of that, their website (and similar ones) have made giving to charity easier.
  23. Devon and Cornwall Police advertised for a "drone team manager". A police force is to launch a round-the-clock drone unit to help tackle crime. Devon and Cornwall Police advertised for a "drone team manager" to set up and manage an "operational and dynamic drone response" from nine policing centres across the two counties and Dorset. The force began trialling drones in November 2015 to test their operational effectiveness, using four DJI Inspire 1 devices with high-definition cameras to assist officers with police matters such as looking for missing people and taking crime scene photographs. Assistant Chief Constable Steve Barry, National Police Chiefs' Council lead for drones, said forces were "committed to embracing new technologies to deliver high-quality, cost- effective services and protection to the public". "Drones are one of a number of options that can deliver air support both now and in the future. "They have the potential to change the way we police by working with other technologies and updating traditional methods of foot and aerial patrols. "Trials and consultations are ongoing to develop more guidance for how the police service can use drones to help keep people safe." Mr Barry added: "Deploying drones is a decision for individual chief constables who ensure that they are used appropriately in the interest of public safety and efficient allocation of police resources." Around 21 police forces are experimenting with the technology. Chief Superintendent Jim Nye, strategic alliance commander for operations in Devon, Cornwall and Dorset, said the drones would be a "significant piece of kit", which would provide an "opportunity to improve technology available to police to better do what we do". Earlier this year, Labour MP Nick Smith said police should consider using drones to track down off-road bikers who are "vandalising" the mountains of Wales. During Home Office questions in the Commons, he said: "Because off-road bikers often go where the police cannot, can the Home Office look into providing resources, agreement and licencing on the use of drones to help us tackle this problem?" View on Police Oracle
  24. Police in a Berkshire town have said they will not send out officers to deal with shoplifters who steal goods worth less than £100. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/03/10/police-tell-town-will-not-chase-shoplifters-steal-less-100/
  25. Robot police were once sci-fi fantasy, but soon the real thing will be patrolling the streets of Dubai. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/2017/03/20/real-life-robocops-will-soon-replace-human-police/