skydiver

Resident Members
  • Content count

    1,796
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    74

Posts posted by skydiver


  1. It varies between forces and roles.  In my force its a bit of a lottery as to when response officers get their standard course with some getting lucky and getting theirs within a few months of starting whilst others have to wait 6 months to a year.  A couple of years ago there was a TV documentary series about Lincs probationers which showed them getting their standard courses just after they finished in company which is very early but really useful when you work in a such a rural force where officers are spread very thinly.   


  2. 2 hours ago, Reader12 said:

    Ok, thanks for all your replies. You have been very helpful. Will report back to the author with this, sounds like he will have to rework things a bit!

    Thanks again :)

    it really depends what he is looking for.  If he is looking for a Midsummer Murders or Morse style murder mystery then it would be spot on but if he is trying to write a realistic police procedural then he is miles away from anything realistic.

    • Like 1

  3. We need some sort of representation but I joined the police to be a police officer not a Fed rep, but given that I am a paying member I expect them to try to act effectively on my behalf and quite frankly I very rarely see that from the national Fed.  Locally they are quite effective so I have got some admiration for some officials but they are a laughing stock nationally.  

    There is another old saying that if you own a dog why bark yourself.


  4. Ah the Fed's strongly worded letter, their main weapon of choice.  I'm left wondering of if they are still keeping their fabled powder dry because I don't see much evidence of them doing anything effective to counter Tory spin regarding the police.  May's response, if she deems it worthy to respond to, will be to repeat the mantra that finding is protected, police have adequate resources, funding has increased, reforms are working and crime is down with any increase being due to better recording,  and last but not least they have fully approved the PRBs pay recommendation.

    • Like 1

  5. May must have taken lessons from the DM and taken one small aspect of police pay and focused all her attention on it.  Its a shame then that she didn't mention that the 1% bonus doesn't apply to unsocial hours payments or overtime and that it is going to be paid for from reserves or budget cuts.  The much vaunted protected budget for my force means that our budget is falling year on year even before the effects of 2.8% inflation are taken into account. 


  6. Lets contrast our pay situation with an MP's pay.  They received an 11% pay rise three years ago after agreeing to reduce some of their expenses.  They also agreed to link their future pay rises to the average rise in public sector pay.  So far so good, however once their pay grew by 11% it also boosted their pensions as the expenses they had originally received would not have affected their pay and therefore wouldn't benefit their pensions.  IIRC tax payers had to pay a few million £ into their pension pot in order to help keep it fully funded.  Secondly linking their pay to public sector rises also mean that it would be affected by increments and changes to the national minimum wage.  There is two problems with that.  First Tories hate increments as they don't see why pay increases should be linked to time in a job, but they now seem happy to benefit from that system in terms of their own pay rises.  Secondly a lot of public sector workers earn the NMW such as cooks, cleaners, drivers etc, so whenever the NMW goes up and remember the government has boosted that so that it has kept pace with inflation whilst the rest of public sector wages have been capped,  MPs will benefit.  That is why they have received a 1.5% and 1.4% pay rise since the 11% rise whilst the headline rate for police, teachers, nurses etc has been capped at 1%. 

    MPs pay rises automatically yet ours is assessed by a so called independent pay remuneration board which seems to have recommended 2.8% this year yet the government has only awarded us 1% with the other 1% coming from further savings or force reserves.  MP's pay awards are met in full by the tax payers and their pay and working conditions seems to defy reform, but when it comes to other people's pay they connive to minimise rises or to force reforms onto us which they seem immune to.

    What has happened to House of Commons and HoL reform?  Nothing that's what.  MP's numbers were supposed to be cut in the 2020 election but May has effectively delayed that by holding the early election before the Boundary commission had put its ideas out for consultation, whilst there have been stories in the papers that the cuts won't be introduced as they will affect the number of Tory constituencies which the Tories and their lack of overall parliamentary majority can't accept.  HoL numbers defy cuts as well with the Lords growing in number almost every year, defying both common sense and reform.  I think that I'm also right in saying that the number of politicians in the UK has grown massively since 1997 with devolution and directly elected mayors and PCCs etc.  At the same time teaching has been reformed and we have gone through Winsor 1 and 2, yet our pay masters are beyond reform and and have set up a nice little pay accumulator which means they benefit no matter what happens in the wider economy.


  7. 2 hours ago, Techie1 said:

    On pay, he said: “We’re not deaf, even if we sometimes give the impression that we are.

    “The message we have heard very clear and constant is about stretch and strain and the pressure experienced police officers telling me they haven’t worked under these conditions before.

    The government definitely does a good job of giving the impression that they are deaf to our concerns about pay and a myriad number of other things  such as the overall level of police funding, AFO numbers, assaults on officers etc.  On pay we should be getting our annual rise now in September but they acknowledged back in June that they hadn't even looked at the PRB submission let alone decided on what we will get meaning that it will be at least  December before we get it.  Remember this comes for a government which back in May said that they would seriously consider pay awards of more than 1% but they then decided not to look at the recommendations for another 3 months.  I worked out that had my pay kept pace with inflation I would have been over £4000 better off than now in gross terms,, whilst I have also lost take home pay due to NI and pension contribution increases.  

    The 'protected' budget for my force is increasing at 0.3% pa when inflation is almost 3% so we are still making cuts and closing police stations, but all the easy cuts were done a long time ago.  We've lost 10% of our work force since 2010 whilst the population has gone up by 10% during the same period.  We're going through our third reorganisation in another vain attempt to match resources to demand but demand continually outstrips resources.  Recent HMIC reports have said that we have been performing well but we've just had another inspection but I don't think we'll come out well from. On example that I've heard is that they made three attempts to report a crime and failed every time due to long call queues or no one manning a front desk.

    Demand isn't going down and partnership working doesn't seem to do a lot for the police particularly when other public sector bodies are facing budget cuts.  In the face of that a decent budget increase and not the paltry 'protected' budget is required.  I'd love to see some concrete proposals from the government but I'm not holding my breath.


  8. 23 hours ago, Radu said:

    In your experiences as a PC,what can you call the positive and negative ways regarding the job.

    And did you had the chance  to advance in your role? As I mentioned, I'm applying  as I'm looking to become a CID or DC.Is anybody in this role and how do you find it?any informations will be much appreciated .

    Cheers

    As I said earlier some forces have direct entry schemes to become a DC but most want PCs to be experienced in other police areas first.  In my force you have to do two years in response or in a local investigation unit before being able to apply for other roles. At that point if we are recruiting DCs candidates have to apply and get through a paper sift with the successful ones being ranked in pools with the best ones getting the first positions as they become available.  Most start work as DCs in the local investigation units as they deal with a broad range of crime from shop lifters to GBH and often get called in to assist complex when they are short of staff. Some new DCs go into specialist safeguarding departments straight away such as child abuse or sexual offences, but the DCs in the local units will get rotated through them after 2-3 years.  New DCs have to take an advanced interview course which includes video interviews, as well as the NIE DC exam. We then have a 4 week CID course followed by a portfolio before finally qualifying as a fully fledged D.  We are expected to do all that within 3 years but I aim to get mine done within 18 m of starting.  We are only allowed 2 attempts at the NIE exam so if you fail both times you go back to being a PC.

    • Thanks 1

  9. Most people with a basic level of fitness will cope with the fitness test but you can download a bleep test from the www if you want to practice.  I'm not sure what I can suggest to help with the push/pull but again the target for that isn't high and unless your technique fails you it is easy to pass.

    Some forces run free 1/2 assessment centre course so its worth asking the force you are applying for or failing that google police assessment centre courses.

    At the moment you don't need any specific level of qualifications to join the police although that is going to change in the near future.

    • Thanks 1

  10. Some forces offer direct entry to become a DC but most current PCs are very cynical about that route.  Most forces still expect new recruits to work on a response shift, neighbourhood or local investigation unit for at least two years whilst they build experience before applying to be a DC, but some forces such as the Met are struggling to fill DC roles so their attitude is different.

    Recruitment takes as long as it takes and can vary tremendously.  My experience was good with the whole process from attending a recruitment night to being attested taking 12 months but I trained with people who had taken 2 years for the same process.  Tightened budgets have also contributed to a start/stop long winded process nowadays.  There were loads of steps for my recruitment from attending an open evening, taking a simple test, passing the paper sift (application form),  medical, eyesight test, fitness test, assessment centre, vetting, and a  final interview.  You only get paid as a PC once you start work and also watch out for some forces which pay probationers different rates depending on whether they have previous police experience or not, although everyone moves to the same pay point after 6 months. 

    An assessment centre course would be a good idea as the police assessment centre is nothing like any other assessment centre I have had experience of.

    Direct entry to Inspector is another very diversive  topic just like direct entry DCs and again it is not popular among the rank and file.

    • Like 1
    • Thanks 1

  11. One more thing Rob.  Your tutor will probably be a lot younger than you and I can guarantee that when you go to domestics people will look to you for advice rather than your tutor because you will look like the experienced one out of the two of you.  Been there done that, but equally I often cringed when a 19 year old student I tutored tried to give marriage advice to a 40 year old couple, so it works both ways.


  12. Most probationers start on response then move on from there.  I was on a cohort of about 22 people and I think that about 18 or 19 went straight onto response to be tutored and even those who were tutored in a neighbourhood shift moved over to response when they were signed off as independent.  Most of the tick box stuff in the SOLAP folder is also easier to do on response than in other departments.  I can't remember what SOLAP stands for but it is there to demonstrate your ability to do a range of activities needed in your role, such as arrests, presenting a prisoner to custody, statement taking, dealing with conflict etc etc.

    Things change though and now in my force students spend time on response and in a local investigation unit getting tutored swapping half way through their 10 week in company period, and remain in that unit for 6 months when they are signed off.

    I know some people who have never left response in 20 plus years whereas others move on as soon as they can as they hated it so much.  I must admit that the novelty of having my baldness, glasses and my similarity to a ladies privates being pointed out constantly for hours on end does get boring sometimes.

    • Like 1