Henro Plod

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About Henro Plod

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  • Birthday 26/12/72

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    London
  1. If you have already completed the questionnaire; then please accept my thanks, if not; the link will be open for another two weeks and your response would be valued.
  2. Institute of Criminal Justice Studies University of Portsmouth Room 5.32 St George's Building 141 High Street Portsmouth PO1 2HY The Reporting of Police Corruption & Misconduct I would like to invite you to take part in my research study by completing an online survey questionnaire. The study is an exploration of the "Blue Code of Silence", which is the theory that police personnel are reluctant to report their colleagues' corruption or misconduct. This research study forms part of my MSc Counter Fraud and Counter Corruption Studies degree. You have been identified as a potential respondent through social and professional networks. I am contacting you in the capacity of a student researcher. It is entirely up to you whether you participate, your choice will have no impact, either positive or negative, on any working relationship we might have, but your response would be valued. All parts of the questionnaire are optional. Please click here to access the questionnaire. Thank you for your interest. Researcher: Stuart Morishita Dubois Academic Supervisor: Dr Martin Tunley Tel: 02392 843986
  3. PC Jailed

    Ok, and I am playing Devil's Advocate here: for drunk driving or stealing £23,000 from a 94 year old widow, the answer is easy. How about much lower level corruption or misconduct, such as an NPT officer accepting a free cup of coffee from a coffee shop on his or her beat?
  4. PC Jailed

    If you witnessed, or became aware of a colleague involved in corruption or misconduct, would you report it? I'm studying towards a criminology MSc degree and am undertaking a research study into exactly this question. I'm getting my questionnaire approved by my university's ethics committee at the moment, and hopefully will be posting a link to it on this forum shortly. It sounds like there are plenty of strong opinions here. Can I rely on volunteers to answer my survey?
  5. Diamond Jubilee Pin

    Peter6bee, In answer to your first question: Yes, within my force. From my observations, those with previous military service seem to wear only their service medals on their tunics, but those of us without military service wear our Queen's Gold / Diamond Jubilee Medal, and LS&GC Medals. My understanding is that a ribbon brooch bar was traditionally worn on the tunic for 'everyday' wear, and the actual medal was only worn for special occasions. Rickshawalla has said above that a medal should only be worn when it is officially authorised, he may be correct, I plead ignorance and can only comment on what I have observed, which is that on what I call 'special occasions' such as Remembrance Day, memorial services / funerals, or for receiving commendations etc, people seem to wear their full medals. As tunics are not actually worn everyday now, I have seen a number of colleagues wear a ribbon brooch bar on their everyday uniform, which is usually a dark/hi-vi stabvest etc, and wear their full medals on those rare occasions that call for the tunic. (Incidentally, tunics are no longer issued in my force to new recruits - but that may start a new thread!) In answer to your second question: my opinion is that if you are proud of your medal, you should wear it proudly. As I mentioned, I don't have military experience. I have huge respect and admiration for my ex-military colleagues who have, sometimes literally, fought for their medals. They sometimes scoff at the QDJ medal, and I just have to take it on the chin. However, my only award so far has been the Queen's Diamond Jubilee medal, and I am proud of my service as a police officer, so I wear my medal proudly.
  6. Pleading not guilty

    Despite some of the inefficiencies in our court system that have already been mentioned, I am proud of the British legal system in which the right to a fair trial is paramount. I have seen the shocking videos and news reports, I feel sickened and angry by this murder, and I have already made up my mind about what I think should happen to the defendants. However, I still defend their right to the presumption of innocence in a fair trial, otherwise how could I be proud of, and defend, our society's values? If, as I believe they will, they are found guilty of murder, then this verdict should be beyond reproach and not open to any criticism that it was 'fast-tracked'.