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  1. 5 points
    I just got back last weekend from two weeks at home in Manchester. The area around the Arena is very familiar to me and i was round and about there a few times during my stay. I spent much of yesterday making sure my family and friends were safe; fortunately, they were. As Zulu' said, Manchester is a strong city; it is also a very diverse city and i am always heartened when I hear a broad Manc' accent spoken by someone who looks Asian, Chinese, African or from some other part of the globe - somehow, it seems to show the city we are - very international with historic ties to many places and a deep history of social justice and innovation - Emmeline Pankhust (a great x 4 relation) - a great emancipator, Tom Kilburn, Tommy Flowers and Alan Turing - the three leading lights in the development of the world's first computers; Messrs Rolls and Royce, A V Roe and many engineers who led the world; not forgetting our sport - Man United and Man City (not forgetting our most heroic foreign player - Bert Trautmann, a German former PoW who played the last 20 minutes of the 1956 Cup Final with a broken neck). That's the city we Mancs are proud to call home. To the families and friends of those killed or injured no words will ever put right their loss and hurt. How unfair that they should suffer because of the warped ideology of a few. For a family to be injured and also lose their Mum, an off-duty Police Officer, and for two Polish sisters to lose their parents seems incomprehensible. May they all Rest In Peace and families eventually be able to remember only the good times with their loved ones. GMP seem to be on top of the situation - arrests have also been made in Libya (the suicide bomber's brother and father). perhaps this atrocity could have been prevented if adequate resources were available - we will probably never know. What was obvious to me was that however slim the resources, on the night as people fled from the scene, men and women from GMP were running towards the unknown to provide whatever aid they could and uphold their oath of office.For that we can be very thankful and for the ambulance and fire crews and the NHS teams who are still working on some of the worst injuries. Manchester aand UK are at their best when backs are against the wall.
  2. 4 points
    I am posting a second message because I did not want to tarnish Elaine's memory with any other remarks. However, I think the time has come for firm action to be taken against the threat-within that exists in many of our big cities. In the short term, all immigration of young men, that is anyone who claims to be from 12 to 35, from Muslim countries must be halted until we can get a grip on the situation. Those on the watch-lists need to be dealt with - if they are not born in UK, they should be removed to their home country immediately - no appeals, no false-flag human rights crap. Remember, this current suicide scrote was born in UK of a Libyan father who himself was an Al Qaeda activist who got UK refugee status on the basis that he opposed Qaddafi; he's now back there working for the police in one of the Islamist stronghold (but even they don't trust him as he has been arrested by them along with his other son). Those born in UK should be removed if they are of foreign parentage. If they are not they must be screened, tagged and subject to tight curfews and restrictions on travel outside their home. At the same time, all mosques must be subject to review - any that have even a hint of extremist views needs to be told that they must remove the extremists or be closed. This isn't an attack on Islam because the perversion of extremism isn't found in the normal interpretation of the Koran nor the teachings of their prophet. This sounds draconian and "not the British way" - well, so be it, It isn't the British way to allow our children to be murdered because of a perverted ideology and idly standby whilst the perpetrators look for more opportunities to harm the country and its people. This situation has been developing for some time; now is the time to stamp down very hard and remove the rot. this can be followed by more efforts to integrate all children into a non-religious education system where rights go along side-by-side with responsibilities and loyalty.
  3. 4 points
    Its a sad indictment of society that NHS staff and paramedics can't be expected to get through their shifts without being assaulted.
  4. 4 points
    I am not a Police officer but have enough experience of policing and as a junior, middle & senior manager in a number of structured organisations, to know that Direct entry to Police above the level of Constable would be very dangerous. There are very few non-Police managers who will have the breadth of experience that will enable them to take both a strategic and tactical view of policing situations and, at the same time, have the tacit knowledge gained from personal experience, that is essential when making decisions within split-seconds and under pressure. I have a pretty open mind (RM please note ) when it comes to developing people and moving them up in organisations depending on their skills and capabilities. However, a Policing environment is different - the "stakeholders" (sorry about that word) in a policing situation are not just Police Officers but the vast array of the public as individuals or organisations with varying levels of interest. To be able to deal with such interests, a Police Supervisor needs experience in dealing with people often in traumatic / pressured situations. That doesn't often happen in office environments nor even in the retail trade. What might be appropriate is for some senior level Police jobs that do not require warranted powers to be done by non-Police officers but the essence of the British Police Officer on-the-streets is that he/she is experienced, can exercise split-second judgement, can be compassionate and well-versed in the rights and wrongs of the Law and what actions they must take or can exercise with discretion. There might be small numbers of former Armed Forces SNCOs and officers who might be able to bring the necessary tactical / strategic skills & experience but run-of-the-mill civilian managers - sorry, not on!
  5. 4 points
    Mark, I'm sure things vary from force to force but personally I am knackered. Every shift I am playing catch up. Last set of lates I had to stay on until 5am on one of them and 3 on the others just to catch up with my admin(and I don't get overtime). Every current missing person is supposed to be reviewed and taskings added. I am usually covering absences so have a responsibility covering a square mileage you wouldn't believe and I daren't write because the public will read it. Every new missing person has to be risk assessed and if it's high I co-ordinate as SIO. On nights I cover PACE as well, I do all the authorisations for vehicle seizures, over time and SIG markers. I am providing advice to often upward of 6 sergeants. Anything that requires safeguarding I review and ratify in writing what we have and haven't done and in between I deal with my complaints workload. I also have assessments for temporary Sergeants under my supervision to do for their promotion diplomas. While juggling all that I attend anything that sounds griefy, violent, complicated or messy. I review the deaths and decide if it's sus or not and carry the can for anything that goes wrong. I make sure I am seen about in all the nicks so people can doorstep me and am constantly putting out "fires". I am just touching on the tip of the iceberg of what I do and what my responsibilities are. -Every shift I am in 30 minutes to an hour early and off frequently long after all the PC's and my sergeants have gone home. On RD's I am checking emails appealing annual leave refusals and negotiating attachments for courses- If I didn't my inbox would fill up too fast I also stand in the CI/Supts office and pin my ears back and take the heat when a PC or skipper makes a mistake-Where I can I absorb that heat and if they don't need to know my teams don't hear about it. One of the new Inspectors on my rotation regularly went to the gents to throw up because his anxiety levels got so high with the responsibility he was carrying.... When I was a PC I had no idea what the Inspector did and very cushy it looked too. Don't get me wrong I enjoy my role but I/we work hard too. If my team spoke about me the way you've talked about your Insp I would be mortified.... HMS
  6. 3 points
    Where have all the old contributors gone to. When the site changed in January I found great difficulty in accessing the forum. I had registered originally with an email address I no longer used because it had been hacked. I could not change my password or anything. It was fortunate that I was able to contact the administrator and Moderators and they managed to sort out my new (Well old secure) email address and for me to set a new password. But where on earth are Quokka, Westie, Itoldyouonce, Cheese, Reasonable Man, GManc,Spider, etc,etc. I have joined one of the sister sites but it appears to be mainly Specials and PCSO's who know everything about everything, whilst, at the same time, knowing nothing. Experience is scorned as a dirty word. There do have to be different opinions, otherwise you would have a sterile environment with every poster saying "Yes I agree" agree, agree. I do hope that the old posters on here have not disappeared for good. Come back we need you. This edit was made after someone clicked "Like" The sister also seems to be very much Met orientated and they seem to work off different rules and even laws than the rest not us Plebs. And before someone replies, I am not anti Met, but there is life north of Watford Gap.
  7. 3 points
    Likewise O.C. As far as I am concerned there should be a zero tolerance regarding any form of violence in our hospitals. Like you I visited and encouraged visits by my officers. Nothing like a cuppa and personally knowing the staff.
  8. 3 points
    I always made a point of visiting A&E Departments when on patrol and as a sgt & inspector I frequently instructed my PCs to do likewise. Quite often, if trouble occurred there were already police officers in the A&E Departments already dealing with RTCs, assaults etc. that had occurred outwith the hospital and they would always intervene if necessary to deal with any disturbances occurring within A&E. Eventually, my old force paid officers overtime to police A&E Departments on Friday and Saturday nights but in the present financial situation I understand this no longer happens. I always thought it was a disgrace that people (usually patients) would act in an abusive manner towards medical staff but when alcohol enters the equation (and it usually does on these occasions) then all logical thought evaporates.
  9. 3 points
    I am not biased against direct entry because I have no right to be. However, as a fairly experienced senior manager across a number of public service-type organisations and 27 years as a Special, I have a view that the complexities and challenges of Policing are such that it would be dangerous to put relatively inexperienced individuals into command positions in potentially difficult situations. I know I need not tell you that the consequences of mistakes in such situations are significant - not just for the individual making the mistake but also others involved in the situation. I do not think that the marginal benefit that some might see from direct entry is worth the trauma and cost that would ensue from an inexperienced direct-entry Inspector making a cock-up simply because they did not have the depth of experience they would have gained if they had joined as a PC and progressed to Inspector through time as a PS.
  10. 2 points
    When I joined, over 50 years ago, the height limit for most police forces in the UK was around 5'10'' with 2 or 3 requiring candidates to be 6'0''. It was necessary in those days for police officers to be large persons as we lacked the excellent equipment which today's officers are issued with to defend themselves or summon assistance quickly and frequently had to depend on our physical prowess to carry out certain aspects of policing. However, things have moved on and given the kit which today's officers are issued, physical prowess and appearance are not as necessary as they were at one time. I see many officers on the streets today who are les than your 5'8''. Good luck.'
  11. 2 points
    Isn't it possible to just stop paying into the pension? Or must you remain in the pension scheme? Each to their own, but cops remaining at work when they could be getting their pension has always baffled me. They are effectively working for next to nothing, seeing as they could be receiving a nice pension for not working. Ok, its a reduced income but then you have to consider you aren't paying into your pension anymore, which boosts it back up to something similar to your current wage. The only way I would keep working for the police after qualifying for retirement is by retiring and then returning to work as civilian staff, that way you get your pension and your salary.
  12. 2 points
    It has to be said since the forums have been taken over by Raw media the popularity of all the linked forums has increased drastically, ps.com under the previous regime was getting between 6-10 members daily, now whenever i log into ps.com i see between 60-100 members online which is fantastic. The same goes for UKPO and this forum, the activity has increased drastically since Raw took over. The team at Raw are clearly experienced individuals and know what they are doing. One of the problems with the previous regime was the very strict moderation style they had akin to the leadership style of Kim Jong Un,thankfully the Raw team are much more relaxed which of course has resulted in more popular and stable forums. Just my 2 cents worth......
  13. 2 points
    I feel its now more about vengeance than justice. The public have a thirst for blood, and the government want to give it to them to appease them. The country will not rest until people are convicted and perhaps imprisoned. Yet I do wonder how a jury can be found that can be unbiased, and not have knowledge of the disaster, and not have been influenced by media etc. I wonder if this will prevent any court case going ahead, or be grounds for appeal?
  14. 2 points
    I agree with the previous two posts. I do not think that the families will ever feel that they have some peace and justice, or be satisfied, I do not think that I would be satisfied, but are they seeking their pound of flesh. I find it amazing, still, that true justice has not been identified. They are blaming, quite rightly, just about everyone involved, Police, Ambulance, Sheffield Wednesday, the F.A., everybody except the fans, who have been exonerated completely. I would, wholeheartedly, agree that the Liverpool fans who were victims were the complete innocents in the whole tragedy, but, to exonerate the fans, on the last minute, some who climbed the gates and those who rushed headlong into the back of the already full pens carry no blame whatsoever. That adds to the injustice of the whole tragic incident. It was a culmination of the F.A. selecting a ground which was unsuitable, Sheffield Wednesday for their Ground safety, and the Police for having a person in charge of the game who was not qualified to deal with such an event, and a complete breakdown of the communications surrounding the event and those taking part. You could also proportion blame on those who decided to make pens at football grounds as a form of crowd control after incidents like Heysel. Am I some sad biased football fan, no I have family in Liverpool and Manchester and have attended at Anfield, and Old Trafford in equal number supporting both teams, but would I dare make these comments on Merseyside?
  15. 2 points
    So far as I can see, no matter what decision was taken by the police in relation to this incident, there was a strong potential liklihood that some form of disaster would happen and the police would be held culpable . If the police had not opened the Leppings Lane gate, to admit those supporters who arrived late, the said supporters would almost certainly have gone of the rampage and caused mayhem of a significant kind which would have attracted the opprobrium of the public etc. towards the police for NOT opening the gates and admitting the late arrivals. I remember an almost identical situation n Glasgow many years ago when it was decided not to open the gates and mounted officers had to be deployed to deal with the irate supporters who declined to disperse. Criticism fell upon the police for their actions in doing exactly the opposite of what happened at Hillsborough. It seems that sometimes you just can't win.
  16. 2 points
    It is a rare opportunity indeed these days. MY first was not a great hit but it started me smoking again, after being stopped for 12 months. Visually I had no problem, as I was told, "Do not think of it as a body, but a piece of meat in a butchers shop. It is a corpse, no feelings but a dead body". I was ok with that as I got the visual impact correct in my mind. However the smell was something that I got completely wrong although, at subsequent P.M.'s it did not affect me because I then knew what to expect. If you want a tip to help with that, get a small jar of "Vick" and smear a very small amount on your nostrils it masks the smell, and that advice was given to me by a pathologist. If you watch and listen you should find it extremely interesting, if he is giving a commentary on what he is doing; showing the sights of a Cardio infarction (Heart attack), or of Cranial haemorrhage (Stroke). If he corpse is of a smoker he/she will show you the condition of the lungs. Non Smoker pink and healthy whereas a smoker will look black and resemble more of a large piece of Coke from a fire. Also prepare yourself for when they use a saw to open the skull, it can be like a dentist drill going through you. There will be many who will leave the room, or even pass out, it is nothing unusual. Hope this does not put you off too much but, hopefully it may prepare you better. Edit, Forgot to mention, the body was once a person so treat the whole process with respect.
  17. 2 points
    Well, according to what I have seen on the news reports, austerity, and from that I assume the drastic cuts in all quarters, is now going to come to an end. We will see if that does indeed to turn out to be the case (let's hope so).
  18. 2 points
    Theres been a recent push in my force to single crew officers, even taser officers. I wouldn't want to be single crewed with a firearm attending routine incidents. It only takes a second to be overpowered and then you have someone pointing your own firearm at you. No thanks.
  19. 2 points
    Our cuts came under Labour, before May, but, to be fair, they have continued under her since. I don't know the figures but the NPA has increased. Labour have never been the friend of the Police Service, and the Conservatives always were pre Winsor. Since then I have noticed that they both have no concern for the Police except trying to gain Political control by PCC's
  20. 2 points
    Of course, it goes without saying, that my condolences are to the families who lost loved ones in the Manchester Arena attack, RIP all those who lost their lives, and I wish a very speedy recovery to all those injured too. Having said all that, I have just seen Sky news, and it was announced that one of those who was killed was a serving police officer. As a retired police officer now, I would also like to say the same to that officer and their family too. On the report that I saw, it did not say whether it was a male or female officer. It matters not. They were killed carrying out their duty, and whether past or present, it could have been any one of us. As I said, RIP.
  21. 2 points
    Totally agree, and if things continue to deteriorate I would hope that HMG give some consideration to internment where appropriate.
  22. 2 points
    It depresses me to say so but, the Government must withdraw the EHRA so that they can deport anyone partaking in terrorism, in any way.
  23. 2 points
    One of the problems with manifestos and policies is that people only think very superficially and never think about the bigger picture. Whilst you might not have heating allowance, other policies that they intend to introduce may well have the effect of making you better off. It seems to be a common misconception with Police officers that the Tories hate the Police and as Labour have said they will recruit another 10,000 Police officers (at varying costs!!) so therefore we will be far better off under Labour. They conveniently seem to forget the fact that to pay for all these extra things Labour are promising, it's going to cost an astonishing extra £75 billion, which quite simply means far heavier taxation. As for what OC mentioned above, I thoroughly agree with. My father is extremely rich, however he gets winter fuel allowance. Why?
  24. 2 points
    The murdered officer has been named as DC Elaine McIver, a Cheshire officer. Her husband has been critically injured and their two children also injured - although it seems not critically. There are really no words that can adequately express the sorrow and despair that will be felt by so many at this loss and the family's situation. May Elaine's soul Rest In Peace and let us hope that her husband and children recover. My sympathy to all their family, their friends and Elaine's colleagues.
  25. 2 points
    These individuals represent everything this country does not need and I do not trust either of them. Quite apart from the economy I remind myself of how they both supported the IRA and continue to refuse to condemn terrorism.
  26. 2 points
    Thanx Chief, I did miss the chance of having a good old moan about something, and making some good points too
  27. 2 points
    It must be good news week. This morning I awoke to, the great news that Ian Brady is dead. My father worked on the original enquiries and was amazed at some of the rubbish written about Brady and Hindley. As far as he was concerned they were the most evil people he ever met. Neither showed any remorse for their actions. May they both now rot in Hell.
  28. 2 points
    I saw the story via Bullshire and UK Cop Humour and saw that every comment on the Sun website was supportive of the police so I think that the intention to write an anti police story has backfired.
  29. 2 points
    "See you tonight Love". "Ok take care" The conversation that every officer has every day on leaving for work, never knowing if he will return. R.I.P. Keith
  30. 2 points
    Things continue to get worse. I don't know whether to laugh or cry when I hear these stories. Still, one of my ancestors told the that my old force used to hire horses from a local undertaker many decades ago when they required a mounted detachment for events but they eventually decided to purchase horses for the mounted branch. Perhaps things will go the full circle and police forces will one day by their own cars.
  31. 2 points
    What a load of rubbish by the DCC, I wish they would start telling the truth….………..'released under investigation” means nothing………they are basically free to commit further crimes. At least bail allowed officers to keep track of suspects after interviewing them. Now, officers will need to get all their evidence together before getting suspects in and once they are in, use the full 24hr clock to finalise the job. This is going to add further pressure on officers to get their work done quicker, resulting in longer delays in getting to active incidents due to lack of resources. More work & pressure for officers in CID & PPU …………………...
  32. 2 points
    I would argue the increase is more in line of folk being more risk averse. With the IPCC forever eager to get involved it's a case of bottom covering.
  33. 2 points
    Indeed, however high the amount goes it will never compensate. But if I were him it would have made me happy to know that my family was going to be able to pay for my funeral and have some financial security for years to come. HMS
  34. 2 points
    Totally agree with regard to references. Few people provide the name of someone as a referee without having first consulted them and ascertained that they will provide comments of a favourable nature. I have only heard of one instance of a referee failing to support the candidate. In my old force we always did unannounced home visits on candidates but I am informed this is no longer the case. There is little doubt in my mind that this aspect of enquiring into the background of candidates had deteriorated.
  35. 2 points
  36. 2 points
    Zulu' To be frank, I think references are worthless unless they are properly examined - in the case of candidates for entry to any Police position (warranted or not), all referees should be visited and examined on their assessment of the individual (I wouldn't do this until the final stage when someone is seriously being considered for appointment). This used to happen - I know for certain that when I joined the Met Specials my three referees were personally interviewed by the then Manchester City Police. One was my former school headmaster who said I was unlikely to stick at it as my attention was quickly diverted - I saw this and the other referees' comments just after I received the first bar to my LS&GC medal (our Regular Liaison Inspector had a sense of the ironic in showing me the headmaster's comments). To get back to the references issue - no-one gives a person as a referee unless they think they will give a good reference. I have done maybe 20+ referee visits and only once did someone suggest that the subject individual might be unsuitable. A lot of background checking these days is done on-line - social-media is a potential mine of information about attitudes, opinions, acquaintances etc but you cannot beat a face-to-face interview with someone who knows the candidate! One way or another, these individuals were either very lucky or "love" made them irrational .............. I'm a cynic - so I think the seeds of dishonesty and poor character were there all the time - they just weren't identified for whatever reason!
  37. 2 points
    We all know how they got through the selection process. Maturity, capability and a track record of ethical behaviour are no longer requirements. I don't say this with any cynicism- these qualities have been deprioritised. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  38. 2 points
    From the information that is now coming to light - no assessment made of his mental health, suppressed evidence of the environment and the situation in his particular duty location, barring a senior RM officer who was critical of the local command and supervision, and a trial by his "peers" who were not actually anything like his peers - three of the panel being HQ RN officers not operational RM officers - suggests to me that justice could not have been at the forefront of the mind of the Military Prosecuting Authority. Perhaps they do training attachments with the CPS. It is difficult to defend someone who is intent on murder but all the circumstances suggest that any other service person might have done the same in those circumstances when they were under extreme pressure and had been badly let-down by their superiors - having seen pictures of the checkpoint that C/Sgt Blackman commanded, it was almost undefendable - low walls, no cover except sweltering hot metal containers, no toilet facilities and no defences again mortars, RPGs, not grenades / IEDs. I am with Frederick Forsyth when he suggests that someone needs to investigate not just the court process but also the chain-of-command. I was amused to see the PM say that the MoD have been supporting the Blackmans throughout the trial and appeal - what an absolute load of b#ll#cks. I rarely use this sort of profanity but this case is definitely an exception where only such a word can describe what was said! :-(
  39. 2 points
    The truth of the matter is that Policescotland is totally and utterly broke. Since its creation various methods have been used in an attempt to make economies, including the controversial reduction of police support staff which means that many officers who should be on operational duties now have to undertake those functions latterly perfromed by the support staff who are no longer there. It has been obvious for some time that the only way to successfully achieve the cash savings required is to reduce the numbers of sworn officers abd that it what is being done. I know of nobody who truly believes anything other than that. The statements issuing from the current Chief Constable and others in authority concerned with Police Scotland amount to nothing more than smoke and mirrors in attempt to placate the public. Why can't they just say `Look, we are broke. We will have to reduce the saize of our establishment if we are to get anywhere near the savings necessary and the public weill just have to accept the reduced service they will receive.''
  40. 2 points
    The two years , I understand, refers to being in the area where you worked. I made such an application and received a reply which stated quote " Decisions on selection for interview are based on the need for each bench to be balanced in terms of age, gender, occupation and residence within an area. I regret to inform you that you are not among those selected for interview. The only item going against me would have been the occupation. Perhaps they failed to appreciate that checking many files, if the evidence was not sufficient then I would mark the file as "No Further Action" irrespective of the defendant. Perhaps it was that I was a White heterosexual Married man, father of three with experience of the Justice System. Now if they wanted a balance across the population they would not have had many Police Officers applying and I know of No Ex Police Officer sitting as a Magistrate anywhere in the Cheshire Lieutenancy. I was informed by an already appointed J.P. that it helps to have a serving J.P. sponsor you, which he and three other would have done. I am wondering if that is an old boys network. You can always apply and see if the mood has changed in the Lieutenancy area where you are.
  41. 2 points
    I am an MOP with a bit of (now rapidly ageing) Police perspective. So, here's my view: A warranted officer is a warranted officer - all the same, irrespective of rank, when the sh#t hits the fan, I expect them all to do the same thing - take action! I once patrolled with the then Chief Superintendent George Rushbrook, on a Sunday morning along the Bayswater Road. George Rushbrook retired as a Commander and was rated in a book, "The Signs of Crime", as one of the most practical detectives in the Met. He was also a really nice bloke. During that Sunday patrol, one of the many things he said was " it doesn't matter who you are in The Job, what matters is what you do". I think that about sums up how I see policing - rank really isn't the issue but what an individual actually achieves is what is important. So Response / CID / Specialist Squads are not so important (particularly to the end-user - Joe & Josephine Public); they would like to see more blue suits with shiny buttons and pointed hats on the streets (with body armour but probably without lime-green or similar hued jackets etc). That's really what policing is about - and has been since 1829 when "the first objective to be obtained is the prevention of crime"! For what it's worth, this is just a view from a man who once rode on The Clapham Omnibus
  42. 2 points
    If you look at it from a military angle, who runs the Regiment the C.O. or the RSM. The ones who come through University usually does 6 months at Sandhurst and come out as a rather incompetent Rupert, whereas the one without that educational background does 2 years and comes out, mainly as a competent junior officer. Education is not everything, knowledge does not necessarily bring experience.
  43. 2 points
    I don't think that anyone can answer that. I am thankful that the many harrowing things I experienced have had no great effect on me - or rather I don't believe they had. I don't know why that is though. You I had colleagues not so fortunate who went wibble sometimes many years later. Not trying to worry you, just saying some are fortunate while others are not. You should have some sort of assistance through your occupational health department and if you are thinking about this in a day or two I strongly recommend making contact with them. The worst thing you can do is take the macho 'I'm a cop, it's what I'm paid to deal with.' attitude. A former colleague of mine, ex Royal Marine, loud, brash, dealt with anything and laughed it off type went missing about six months after he retired. Turned out he wasn't as capable of dealing with all that stuff as everyone thought. Happy ending but he came back to some psychological treatment to see him through that maybe he should have had years before. Good luck.
  44. 2 points
    I do travel a bit. It's an interesting question as to how well travelled - I counted up and it's over 30 different countries as well, whether that counts as well travelled I have no idea. Probably not. However I have experienced other police forces which range from the truly awful to superb. The point I was making was less about the institution of policing but more about the effectiveness of them, hence the crime rates aspect. I realise that police are not solely responsible for that - there are many other factors, but it's an indication. I was also comparing with similarly Western developed countries - European ones in the main. The main thrust was to counter the argument that we are not the best by any means. Incidentally where we do fall down is in smartness. We must be getting on for one of the scruffiest police organisations in the world! Dont misunderstand me, I'm not denigrating the Police in any way, it's a fantastic job. However having done a few years I do recognise its faults and that it's not perfect. We have been trading on the legacy of tradition and reputation 'the good old British bobby' for far too long and it's not helping us any more. Someone described the police about 10 years ago as 'slowly coming to terms with the twentieth century' which I thought was quite apt. We need to adapt to modern times and with 19th century thinking that's never going to happen. The evidence is clearly there to suggest that things are not perfect so changes need to be made. Yes Direct Entry might not work. But conversely it might and until we try it, how will we know?
  45. 2 points
    I would suggest the need for change in a functioning system is the thing that needs to be evidenced, not the need not to. Evolution has a lot of dead ends and extinctions and I would rather we didn't utilise trial and error when lives are at stake. So I disagree- where is the evidence? I am not the one saying things are so bad we must transplant a major organ in the Policing physiology....
  46. 2 points
    I am also here still, but just jump in, have a look around and jump out again, often without logging on. I expect a few others do the same. As I am "getting on" now, and have caring duties for my 92 year old mother, I get less time for perusing the ether, but will still do so, when i have time.
  47. 2 points
    Your opinions and you are welcome to them. I must say though the polcomforum is not just for PCSO's or Specials, regular officers who have got ALOT of experience are some of our most regular contributors,just because they don't agree with you does not mean they "know nothing" As for this forum, yes it is quiet, it has been very quiet for a number of years now, however hopefully in due course it will pick up. What might be more constructive than insulting members from a different forum is to give your ideas on how this forum could be improved?
  48. 2 points
    You are there to make the decisions and you live or die by them. Many times the troops do not know the flack that are shielding them from. Strange that my children now thank me for the guidance through those tender years, up to about 30.
  49. 2 points
    Amy, I did your survey however I would like you and you supervisor to have the following feedback. Your questions are loaded. For example there is an entire section where you force the subject to give evidence of racial bias both positive and negative. There is no option to express that you find it inappropriate to utilise racial stereotypes only to say what they are. Many of your questions are largely binary in nature but the topics you approach much more complex. Like do you believe all rapists should receive punishments beyond imprisonment like "being whipped in the streets". If you are going to ask questions like that you need to give an option for each case being treated on it's own merits. Much of the survey appears aimed at people who are still in full time education rather than Police Officers. Whoever wrote that has a simplistic view of the world and apparently a neo liberal political view with a dislike of Police Officers. In essence Martin Luther King or the Archangel Gabriel(If he exists) could complete your survey and it would make them appear racist. Can I ask you some questions:- Your survey is it intended to a) Denigrate Police Officers b ) Insult Police Officers c) Get rid of Police Officers or d) Embarrass Police Officers. Do you think Police Officers are :- Somewhat racist b ) Very racist c) Extremely racist d) Unicorns Sorry they are the only answers you get and you have to choose one....... This is poor biased work.
  50. 2 points
    I agree, it is pour Intel and briefing at fault. However it is Q9 who us going to have to live with the fact that he took a life. What will that fact have on him, and his family.