All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Yesterday
  2. Last week
  3. Height

    Here’s hoping eh? Thank you for this!
  4. Height

    Tutored females 5 feet one and 2 with size 2 feet and this was in 1999-2001.The equality laws were in place by then but mother nature decreed most blokes were bigger than most women. You have nothing to worry about physically.nut this site can only reassure you.You will only be happy when the tick in the box is there from recruitment and we can say to you we told you so!!! good luck.
  5. Height

    Thank you for this! I’m 5’9 so only an inch over what was the minimum not too long ago. Even if I was shorter, I’d definitely still apply as it’s my dream job! I must admit, I’m anxious but excited.
  6. Police Federation calls on chiefs to take action. Cuts have led to a substantial increase in fatigue and stress Senior officers and the government must do more to tackle a crisis in detective policing as morale hits rock bottom, the Police Federation says. It is warning the role is no longer desirable or sought after and victims may be failed as a result of worsening conditions. The staff association’s detective forum has released the results of its annual survey which found that 90 per cent of respondents said they had taken time off due to mental health and wellbeing issues either caused by or exacerbated by their work. Some 56 per cent said service cuts have had a huge impact on their morale while over a quarter of detectives felt their physical and mental health had been affected Half of those who answered also said cuts had led to a substantial increase in fatigue and stress as they battled to keep up with demand. Karen Stephens, secretary of the Police Federation national detective forum, said: “The facts speak for themselves. These results clearly show that detectives are overwhelmed with increased pressures brought on by a lack of resources. “Morale is low, people are exhausted and there is little sign of improvements to come if things stay the way they are.” Three-quarters of detectives said they were not able to provide the service victims need due to their workloads being too high. Mrs Stephens said: “The single aim of every officer, detectives included, is to protect and help others. But what these results show is that despite their best efforts, the demands of the role do not allow them to do this. "This is further emphasised with over half of the respondents saying they did not even have time to stay up to date with the latest training. “Being a detective was always a sought after, desirable role. However this survey shows things have changed and not for the better.” She called on the NPCC, College of Policing and government to act on the warning sounded by her members. Earlier this year HMIC warned that a shortage of detectives is a national crisis for policing in England and Wales. Chiefs have previously asked to be allowed by government to pay detectives bonuses for carrying out their roles, but were told by the pay review body to show evidence for why this would actually help. NPCC lead for detective recruitment and retention, Deputy Chief Constable Matt Jukes said: "Detectives do a vital job investigating crimes, apprehending offenders and protecting people from harm – and I know that all chiefs are proud of the work they do. "Forces have been aware for some time of the challenges that today’s survey describes, and it is always a concern when colleagues feel overworked and undervalued. "The complex nature of investigations and our work to protect vulnerable people has made the role of detectives even more challenging. We are facing a challenge to recruit and retain in these roles, which is adding to the pressure on serving detectives." He added: “We are looking at a range of ways to improve the situation, including reviewing the way detectives are selected and trained, providing improved workplace support to existing detectives which recognises how their work is changing, as well as looking at changes to incentivise more people into these important roles.” View on Police Oracle
  7. Height

    When I joined, over 50 years ago, the height limit for most police forces in the UK was around 5'10'' with 2 or 3 requiring candidates to be 6'0''. It was necessary in those days for police officers to be large persons as we lacked the excellent equipment which today's officers are issued with to defend themselves or summon assistance quickly and frequently had to depend on our physical prowess to carry out certain aspects of policing. However, things have moved on and given the kit which today's officers are issued, physical prowess and appearance are not as necessary as they were at one time. I see many officers on the streets today who are les than your 5'8''. Good luck.'
  8. SPEED limits Motorway

    I drive fairly slow on motorways because I have an old car with a lot of miles on the engine and am constantly getting tailgated by very fast saloons and sports cars that are driving over the speed limit but instead of overtaking by going into the faster lanes on the right they flash me. It just seems a power or ego trip to try and prove you can drive faster & nothing to do with the law or safety. Leave slower drivers alone they are doing nothing wrong . It's the power drivers that are breaking the law by tailgating and flashing that are inconsiderate and driving without due care and attention
  9. Height

    Thank you guys, it wouldn’t stop me applying regardless! Just needed to hear what people thought. My main worry was public confidence and my ability to do the job, thank you!
  10. Height

    If it helps, I'm only 5'08". I joined when there was a height restriction! Most of my shift were old school and all were above 6 foot. I've managed quite well for my near 27 years service so don't worry at all. Just set yourself up for a lot of "Little Man Syndrome" quips.
  11. Height

    Relax, it should be no problem at all. Hope everything goes alright for you.
  12. Height

    Good evening, I have recently registered my interest to join my local force and I’m to attend an engagement event on the 19th of October, I’m incredibly excited as being a police officer was my childhood dream. I believe I carry all the necessary skills and qualities of a police officer. My current job requires decision making, effective communication and empathy etc. My only real concern is my height, I’m 175cm or 5’9. I know the restriction used to be 5’8 until the 90s, but still I’m anxious at how well I’ll be able to do the job. I’ve recently began focusing on fitness to improve my upper body strength and stamina. I currently weigh 154 pounds, so I’m well aware I’m not the biggest. Is this going to put me at a disadvantage? Maybe im being too self-critical, but I would just like to hear what officers think and from officers of a similar build, and how they cope with the job.
  13. Earlier
  14. it really depends what he is looking for. If he is looking for a Midsummer Murders or Morse style murder mystery then it would be spot on but if he is trying to write a realistic police procedural then he is miles away from anything realistic.
  15. Ok, thanks for all your replies. You have been very helpful. Will report back to the author with this, sounds like he will have to rework things a bit! Thanks again :)
  16. The operation-stalling attack was kept under control by the force's Cyber Crime Unit. Left to right: Special Sergeant and Lead on Cyber Specials, Michael Moore, Nick Carver and Special Constabulary Chief Officer, Mark Kendrew. Special Constables who helped the NHS during the summer’s cyber-attack have been recognised at a ceremony celebrating their work. The group from Hertfordshire Constabulary’s Cyber Crime Unit lent their skills and support to the Lister Hospital in Stevenage. Their work was praised by Chief Constable Charlie Hall and the CEO of the East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust, Nick Carver. Mr Carver said input from the specials meant patients were not as adversely affected by the cyber-attack in Hertfordshire. Their award was part of a dedicated Employer Supported Policing (ESP) event at Police Headquarters. CC Hall said: “We are focused on protecting vulnerable people and need to adapt our workforce to help investigate such crimes –volunteers with the different skills we require can help. “We want to continue the conversation with you and your organisations to see how we can work to encourage your staff to give up their time to come and help us. The value we give back to you will help your staff, your businesses and society as a result." He added. There are currently 25 organisations signed up to the ESP scheme in Hertfordshire, including Tesco, Which?, McMullen Brewery and Sons and local district and borough councils. View on Police Oracle
  17. Yes, ours should have done but they were too busy.
  18. CID dealing with a wounding, it's like something off the telly.
  19. Dealt with many GBH (section 20 or section 18) on my own as a uniform beat PC.Where I policed they were 10 a penny.Nor were they rocket science.So long as the court file was right you never heard from a CID supervisor other than closing comments that they had overseen it on the closing comments screen.This isnt disrespecting CID who would have been involved if the case had been messed up.
  20. I'm have never known one Det. Insp. attend hospital for a GBH case let alone two. If the case was serious enough then they might, might get a D.Sgt, and D/C. It is usually the lower ranks that do all the donkey work, usually D.C's but occasionally a D.S. D.I.'s are usually in the office to supervise over seeing cases and admin.
  21. Nowadays you'd be lucky to get one overworked DC to cover a GBH let alone 2 DIs. Sergeants and Inspectors tend to have a management role in investigations and in their departments as opposed to being hands dealing with suspects and witnesses.
  22. The Policing Minister Nick Hurd said he wanted to understand more about demand and capacity within the service ahead of the spending review. Conservative PCCs showing their support for our Protect The Protectors campaign (left to right) Julia Mulligan, David Munro and Katy Bourne. The Police Federation says its Protect The Protectors campaign was top of the agenda at a meeting with the Policing Minister and other MPs during the Conservative Party Conference. Following a similar event at the Labour Party Conference last week, a contingent of national and local PFEW representatives raised issues including the recent one per cent pay award and one per cent force-funded bonus. The Policing Minister Nick Hurd said he wanted to understand more about demand and capacity within the service and is undertaking a review of police funding ahead of the government's Spending Review later this year. The group also discussed the College of Policing's directives to bring in qualifications and accreditation to the service as well as Direct Entry and how the scheme impacts on officers. PFEW Chairman Steve White, who attended the event ahead of a roundtable meeting with Mr Hurd, said: "Of course the Federation isn't always going to agree with government and we had frank exchanges at times but we have to maintain an open dialogue with decision makers and overall it was a positive and productive meeting. "National and local representatives were able to talk and debate issues direct with the Policing Minister and other MPs and PCCs which will undoubtedly help with our work to inform and change policy for the benefit of our members." All attendees stated they are behind the Protect The Protectors campaign which calls for a specific offence to be introduced for assaulting officers or other emergency service worker and harsher sentences for those who do punch, kick or spit at officers to help as a deterrent. Home Secretary Amber Rudd said: "My department is working with the Police Federation on its campaign to Protect The Protectors. We’ve already funded a new police welfare service, we are reviewing the law so the police can pursue the appalling thugs on mopeds who attack people on our streets and we’re also examining whether we need clearer rules so that anyone who assaults an emergency service worker faces a tougher sentence. The police protect us and it’s my job to ensure we protect them." View on Police Oracle
  23. Hi. I am proofreading a novel and have a few questions. The author has stated that 2 Detective Inspectors liase with the family in the hospital after serious GBH and briefly question the victim's girlfriend in one scene. Would two Detective Inspectors investigate this? Or would it be one detective alone? Or some other rank of officer or a mixture? Would they be wearing plain clothes? Sorry for all the questions. Just want to make sure I get this right :) Any help is appreciated!
  24. If anyone should tell the public the truth it is the Police Service itself. For decades police officers of all ranks have being telling the public that everything in the garden is rosy and that the Nation was being served by the best and most efficient Police Service in the World. The truth of the matter is that for years we bluffed our way through thick and thin and we did it so well that the people and many politicians came to believe what was being said and arrived at the conclusion that policing on the cheap could be achieved without any harm being done to anyone and that, no matter how overstretched or underfunded police forces were, the job could always be done by the good old British bobby. As I reflect over the past half-century I have no doubt that we must accept at least part of the blame for the current state of affairs.
  25. Paying into Police pension

    I guess they didn't listen to you. Perhaps they thought that it was better that not everyone lost out. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  26. Paying into Police pension

    I said should have been scrapped, it was not but should have been brought in with the new pension scheme. What is the point in officers being transferred to the 2015 scheme and protected officers are working 30yrs, stopping their payments and carrying on working and receiving maximum benefit when everyone else is losing money……wrong……. totally wrong in my view……..I spoke out regarding this on the old site and was shouted down and still speak out about this today, the the middle third officers are suffering the most. Lets correct the wrong and stop this happening……………...all officers pay pension to retirement or death………..simple.
  27. Best CID shift pattern.

    Looks like CID are all coming back to districts as the crime team as HQ did not work, I could have told them that, bigger is not better. The Chief Supt. will now be in charge of them and looks like they will be working two weekends in four. Each district are working a different shift pattern so it is up to bosses to decide, detectives not happy, welcome to the real world
  28. Can you cause affray with a vehicle?

    It could be Section 4 or 5 of the Public Order Act. Don't expect a huge amount of interest from the local police though. In the scheme of things this is not major crime. If it is a private car park then a complaint to the drivers boss, supported by some video evidence may stop his juvenile behaviour. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  1. Load more activity