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  1. Today
  2. There is a school of thought that assaults on us constitute "part of the job". Many of those that share that school of thought are in government and the judiciary. Consequently there is limited punishment. There is also a further very good reason that criminals do not give a damn about the consequences. In days gone by an officer would have felt that if he/she had been assaulted he/she would have been supported in robust self defence. Now there is an awful lot of scrutiny on Police use of force..a pre-emptive strike is almost unthinkable. Police officers are limited in what they can do to defend themselves and the judiciary is limited in what it will do to punish those that assault Police. Why wouldn't it become common? HMS
  3. Yesterday
  4. Kirpan - Offensive Weapon?

    Nobody should be allowed to carry any sort of offensive weapon. When anyone with a kirpan leaves their home they must not take it with them or it should be plastic. Also do actual police officers answer? And kirpans definitely shouldn't be allowed in schools i swear some kid in one of my previous schools brought a knife in.
  5. When asked by a Cief Officer, "What can we do for you" How about the reply, "When I call for urgent assistance you could make sure that there enough officers for someone to attend" I wonder how that would go down?
  6. Visit from Maggie, 11, whose father was killed on duty prompts announcement. Maggie Henry was made chief constable for a day A force has promised that anyone assaulted on duty will receive contact from a chief officer to check on their welfare. Bedfordshire Police has changed the policy and dubbed it ‘Maggie’s Law’ after the daughter of PC John Henry, killed on duty in Luton in 2007, spent at day at its headquarters. According to a statement from the force, 11-year-old Maggie Henry wants to help the force “look after our police officers, so that they can look after everyone else”. The chief officer team will now take the lead on checking that personnel who have been attacked get the support they need. Bedfordshire Police had already adopted the seven point plan on police assaults, first developed in Hampshire, which commits to treating assaulted officers as victims of crime. Chief Constable Jon Boutcher said: “Without question, an assault of any kind should never be considered ‘part of the job’. “Our workforce walks into danger when others walk away and sadly verbal and physical assaults are becoming commonplace – but that doesn’t mean it is acceptable. “Our officers should be afforded the support they need and deserve. This means they are treated the same way as any other victim of crime, they feel valued and that those who attack police officers are not dealt with lightly.” Bedfordshire Police Federation Chairman, Jim Mallen added: “Looking after officers and staff members who have been assaulted while doing their duty should be a primary consideration for police leaders. “The Police Federation brought into Bedfordshire the seven point plan and Maggie's law seems a natural extension to highlight to those assaulted that we care about them and will do our utmost to support them.” PCC Kathryn Holloway said she has raised the issue of short sentences for people who attack officers with the government. “I never want another family in this county to experience what Maggie Henry and her family have had to go through,” she added. “In my view, an attack on a police officer is not the same as an assault on any other member of the public, since police are standing on the front-line between those who keep the law and those who want to undermine it. “An attack on a single officer is an assault on society itself and should be met with the toughest penalty possible.” View on Police Oracle
  7. Last week
  8. Advice about joining CoLP

    Recruitment Query Not Permitted On Your Account This has been posted in the wrong area of the forum. Your account does not have an active membership or a current Recruitment Pass. You must post your topic in the Recruitment Area or Force Specific Areas of our forum Recruitment Pass A Recruitment Pass can be purchased for 1 month (£3.95) or 3 months (£7.95) and is renewable. During its active period you will be able to create as many topics and make as many replies as you like in the Police Career & Training Areas and the Recruitment sections of our forum. CLICK HERE to purchase a Recruitment Pass Membership Plans You can purchase an annual Silver Membership Package for just £15 which will give you unrestricted access to the Recruitment Sections and to all of the Police Career & Training Areas. We also include access to the exclusive VIP areas. Click HERE to see all of the benefits of a Membership Package. We also have our Gold Membership which gives global Gold Membership across all four of our forums and is a one time lifetime fee and we even throw in a FREE mug. Forums included are www.police.community, www.ukpoliceonline.co.uk, www.policespecials.com and www.policeuk.com CLICK HERE to purchase a Membership Plan This thread has been locked as the original poster has posted this in an area of the forum where it is not permitted and their account does not currently have the required permissions.
  9. Sooooo, queue the generic question... I was looking for some advice/officer experience from City of London Police. Do they 'carry' their own workload or is it standard response whereby initial details are taken and then passed to relevant unit? If so, how many crimes does each officer normally have? Is there scope to progress in skills quite quickly? Class 1, taser, PSU.... Is there much time to be proactive/out and about? Would you advise someone to join the job? Anything else.... Thank you in advance :)
  10. Chief inspectors and commander posts will still exist beyond 2018. Commissioner Cressida Dick has cancelled plans to abolish two ranks in the Met. Last year Police Oracle revealed the force planned to do away with chief inspector and commander posts in 2018. But its subsequently-appointed force leader has called a halt to the idea. A spokesman said “removing two ranks is not the best approach to achieve the outcomes we need”. Police Oracle also revealed that the force had already spent more than £27,000 on the promotion process for potential future chief inspectors before deciding to drop the ranks – with more than 229 officers having applied. The force spokesman said: “The commissioner has signalled very clearly that the Met will introduce flatter management structures and that she is increasing the pace of reform. "However, after extensive consultation, and due to the step-change to our operational context in recent weeks, she has concluded that removing two ranks entirely is not the best approach to achieve the outcomes we need at this time. “In the coming months we will see flatter leadership structures that empower officers to use discretion and make decisions in different units across the Met. “We will also continue to work closely with the NPCC lead on reforms to leadership structures and maintain our place at the forefront of this work.” Reducing the number of ranks in policing was a key recommendation from the College of Policing’s leadership review and the UK’s largest force appeared to be leading the way in implementing it. Met Fed branch chairman Ken Marsh welcomed the change of heart. “It wasn’t thought out very well to begin with, now the Commissioner has given it proper thought I think what will happen will be planned far better,” he said. On the potential for inspectors to gain promotion to chief inspector ranks again, he added: “They were in the process when it stopped, I’m pleased for them and inspectors will now be able to become chief inspectors.” View on Police Oracle
  11. Labour says visibility has rarely been lower and 'blame lies squarely at the government's door'. The number of people who believe police are "highly visible" in their community has fallen by almost half, statistics show. Just one in five (22 per cent) people said they feel officers are highly visible, according to the latest Crime Survey for England and Wales, which looks at the period from April last year to March this year. This compared with 39 per cent in April 2010 to March 2011, while the percentage of the public who said they "never" see police foot patrols has risen by more than half, from 25 per cent to 39 per cent. It follows a survey last year, which found that one in three people in England and Wales has not seen a bobby on the beat in their local area in the past year. The poll carried out for HMIC found 36 per cent of people had not seen a police officer or PCSO on foot in their areas in the past year - while just under a quarter (23 per cent) had seen uniformed personnel "once or twice". The watchdog warned of the "erosion" of neighbourhood policing as forces are forced to make further financial cuts. Labour's Shadow Policing Minister Louise Haigh said: "Bobbies on the beat don't just reassure the public they collect vital community intelligence and help to keep us safe. Savage cuts mean this tried and tested bedrock of British policing is being chipped away as police withdraw from neighbourhood policing altogether. "Police visibility has rarely been lower and the blame lies squarely at the Government's door. "The Tories shamefully accused the police of crying wolf over police cuts, but now the public are seeing the brutal reality; crime rising and fewer officers on hand to keep them safe." A Home Office spokeswoman said: "Effective policing is not just about the number of officers on the street but about accessibility - having a presence where people now live their lives and are at risk, for example online. "The latest data from the independent Crime Survey for England and Wales shows that nearly two-thirds of the public believe that the police are doing a good or excellent job, and we encourage forces to be innovative, including making best use of technology in the way in which they engage so they meet the needs of all sectors of the community." Last month a number of anonymous former senior Met officers stressed the importance of Safer Neighbourhood Teams, the force’s “eyes and ears” on the ground. The officers claim the teams have been key to detecting signs of radicalisation and gang-related activity in the past. They explained that in 2007 every ward in every London borough boasted a team made up of a sergeant, two police constables and three community support officers. Now there are just three officers in each team, with each unit covering three or four wards. View on Police Oracle
  12. Five officers and a nurse were all attacked by pair in one evening. Five officers and a nurse were assaulted by the men throughout the course of the night. Northumbria Police has appealed for witnesses after an officer was knocked unconscious and four of her colleagues attacked by a pair of thugs. Police were called to Newcastle City Centre shortly after 3am on Monday August 14 to reports two men had punched and kicked members of the public and ran off. Two officers attended and a violent struggle ensued in which both officers were assaulted with one knocked unconscious. The pair were eventually detained and taken to Forth Banks station where a nurse and three detention officers were also assaulted. The force believes a number of people will have seen the attack on the officers and are appealing for witnesses. Four men in particular stopped to help the officers during the struggle but then left the scene without providing their details. Acting Chief Inspector Steve Wykes, of Northumbria Police said: “I’d like to thank the four men who came to our officer’s aid - it was brave of them to do so but they left before our officers could get their details. “I’d ask them to come forward and speak to us so we can thank them for their actions. The offender’s behaviour is wholly unacceptable and will not be tolerated by Northumbria police. “While I am pleased to report that the officers are not seriously injured this was an awful incident and the officers are receiving support. “I’d also appeal for anyone who was in the area of St Nicholas Street and Castle Stairs who may have witnessed the incident to contact police.” The officer who was knocked out was taken to hospital for her injuries but later released. Two men aged 25 and 36 years were arrested on suspicion of assaulting an officer in the execution of their duty and are detained in custody helping police with their enquiries. View on Police Oracle
  13. Earlier
  14. No matter what the truth of this issue, or whether it will prove good or bad, I have no doubt that money is at the root of the matter. Due to the fincncial situation in which our nation finds itself, cuts in the amounts of cash given to all parts of the public sector have to be made and it appears that the Poilce Service is not to be excluded from these strictures. While sympathising with HMG in its financial predicament I cannot but think that cutting the finances of the Police Service will, in the long term, be a false economy as policing will gradually become increasingly erodied and lawlessness will gradually increase with the inevitable costs. As I have said before, HMG should give priority to its principal functions of protecting the country and its inhabitants and exclude polcing from the worst parts of cuts on the public sector.
  15. If it was years the Ms Dick would have beeb fully aware. She could have said "No" But as usual it will be ignore the public, they are here to serve us, not the other way round.
  16. Never miss a chance to have a dig but seriously? Commissioner Dick took charge on 17 April 2017 and the mergers were implemented two weeks later. The article says that the DAC in charge was talking about the scheme back in November and something on the scale would have been months, if not years in planning. Do you think Ms Dick should have just said, 'OK, the staff don't like change so I will just put it all back as it was.'?
  17. UCL project exploring evidence recreation working on veracity of 3D modelling. Dr Morgan is enthusiastic about the changes to evidence preservation the PhD work may be able to facilitate. Exact 3D printed replicas of evidence artefacts may hold the key to the way crimes are investigated and prosecuted in the near future. A project at University College London, conducted by PhD student Rachel Carew, is exploring the possibilities around recreating exact copies of pieces of evidence to prevent decay over time. This could help detectives working on cold cases in which the original piece of evidence has deteriorated. Dr Ruth Morgan, director of the centre for forensic sciences at University College London who is overseeing the project, says there may be a number of advantages in preserving evidence in this way. She said: “One of the benefits is being able to preserve an exhibit in its original state meaning we can look at it in ten or 20 years time and evaluate it with new technologies in a way that may not previously been possible. “We are trying to work out the best ways of creating really accurate 3D models which can then be used… we have a lot of people working on this and the work that’s going is aimed at getting the accuracy part of the process spot on. “Cold cases is an area with real potential benefits because often you are going back to exhibits collected many, many years ago. “It can be difficult to evaluate them in the way you would have at the time as there are a lot of factors that can impact features of evidence.” The technique may also enable evidence to be used in a different way in courtrooms, potentially bringing juries closer to pieces of evidence which would previously have remained untouched. However, Dr Morgan warned of the possible ethical and practical limitations, adding: “It is interesting how we will be able to explain to a jury what has been done with the models and there are interesting considerations which need to be taken into account. “For example, how do we preserve exhibits that may be from an individual? Say you were recreating somebody’s skull, you need to have a robust system in place to preserve integrity and the rights of the individual and it needs to be done appropriately.” In terms of how far away this technology is from being deployed in the field, Dr Morgan says the technology already exists but the study is about demonstrating its worth and veracity in practical use. She said: “The technology is there and it’s a case of ‘can we demonstrate the value’. “The quicker and more accurately it be done the better, I think we are talking about a year or two rather than ten or 20 years (for widespread use). “It’s a cool area for this PhD, which has literally just started, but there is a lot of good potential.” Dr Morgan has previously warned about the “knowledge gaps” around what forensic evidence means or is able to tell us and the work she is overseeing around 3D modelling may help create a wider understanding in this regard. View on Police Oracle
  18. writer research

    Hi Most murders are put on Holmes, (I'm talking larger forces here) which dishes out the actions (enquiries) for the DCs to do. It's rare for DIs to go out and do the enquiries themselves - programmes like Morse and the Sweeney have a lot to answer for! in general the DSs run the jobs - on direction from above. The DIs tend to dictate the strategy. Obviously on a call out the DIs will be there, but thereafter it tends to be delegated more. Each force is different though. Some of the smaller forces do it differently, though investigating a dead sheep is perhaps less serious! 😉
  19. writer research

    Thanks, Zulu, for answering that.
  20. Fiearms Certificate

    If you declared them last time then it is essential that you declare them this time. If the motoring convictions were as far back as 1980 I would be amazed if they would decline to renew your firearms licence. Just make sure that you can account for the firearms and the amount of ammunition held. As you said S.W. Police are taking a hard line on undisclosed convictions. You have already disclosed them. It appears that some people may not have been disclosing past convictions and it is those where a problem and crack down arises.
  21. Fiearms Certificate

    Thanks for the reply Zulu22. Last time I did indeed declare my driving convictions...but with the caveat that the timings were approximate. Unfortunately this doesn't seem to cut much swathe now...SW Police want to know exact dates [or so I've been told]. cheers John
  22. Fiearms Certificate

    What did you declare last time, I suspect that you did not include those in 1980. Not too sure of the wording now in the questions but I would suspect that as you are only renewing the certificate you would not declare two driving convictions nearly 40 years ago that you cannot remember the details of. The think that the only one you would need to declare would be a conviction like Driving over the drink drive limit. But, this is only the advice that I give and I could be wrong having retired 5 years ago.
  23. Fiearms Certificate

    Hello there, I hope non-police are welcome here...if not I'll quietly leave:-) Anyway I have a query & I was wondering if someone could help me with it? I currently hold a FAC...& its up for renewal in a few months time. My force [South Wales Police] is taking a hard line on any non-disclosed convictions...which as you probably know includes old driving convictions. I ordered a PNC check [which came back clean] but it did not mention any old driving convictions. I know I had a speeding ticket sometime in the 80s & possibly a driving without care & attention around the same time. I cannot for the life of me remember whether I had a verbal warning or it went to court. To be honest I don't want to put down the wrong info on my renewal form [not with this hard line they are taking]...so how can I find out about any old endorsements etc I may have had? I've been on the DVLA site & all it shows is I currently have 0 Penalty Points! Thanks in advance John
  24. https://strawpoll.com/8sb2f73z I am conducting some research into how to help police officers mental health more effectively, please take the time to answer this poll. Thank you.
  25. Being papered by IPCC

    I believe so but, the Federation can tell you 100%
  26. Being papered by IPCC

    With the old Reg 9s we were always advised to say nothing and send it to the Fed Rep and they would see what it was all about.i take it, it will be a similar procedure.
  27. writer research

    It is unlikely that the DI would be making the enquiries, that would be done by the murder team, D.C's or D.S's. There would probably be a Det.Supt. in charge and the team would attended the morning briefing for updates, and the allocation of enquiries. The OIC would keep the senior officers above him appraised of any progress and that would be progressed up to the Chief Constable.
  28. writer research

    Hello, I'm writing a novel about a police officer investigating a serial murderer in the mid 90s (original, eh?!) Although I have lots of great research material (Murder Investigation Manual, Crime Writer's Guide to Police Practice and Procedure, etc,) I have some questions - rather stupid and basic, but I need to know! I'd be very grateful if you could help me. So, imagine there's a serial murderer, it's been happening once a year for six years, I want to focus on a female lead investigator, Sullivan, would she be a DI? Would that be the correct rank? Who would be in charge of her? A DCI? Would he be the guy she would come back to the office to keep informed? And who would her oppo be? If she has a partner she works with - maybe they sometimes go to the scene of a crime together, etc, what would his rank be? Sorry to ask such daft questions, but I'd like to get these things right.
  29. And, some thought Cressida Dick was the Bees knees. Demoralising the troops is not a very clever strategy.
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